Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Having or giving off heat; capable of burning.
  • adjective Being at a high temperature.
  • adjective Being at or exhibiting a temperature that is higher than normal or desirable.
  • adjective Causing a burning sensation, as in the mouth; spicy.
  • adjective Charged or energized with electricity.
  • adjective Radioactive or designed to use radioactive materials.
  • adjective Marked by intensity of emotion; ardent or fiery.
  • adjective Having or displaying great enthusiasm; eager.
  • adjective Informal Arousing intense interest, excitement, or controversy.
  • adjective Informal Marked by excited activity or energy.
  • adjective Violent; raging.
  • adjective Sexually attractive.
  • adjective Sexually attracted; full of desire.
  • adjective Sexually aroused.
  • adjective Recently stolen.
  • adjective Wanted by the police.
  • adjective Close to a successful solution or conclusion.
  • adjective Most recent; new or fresh.
  • adjective Currently very popular or successful.
  • adjective Requiring immediate action or attention.
  • adjective Slang Very good or impressive. Often used in the negative.
  • adjective Slang Funny or absurd.
  • adjective Performing with great skill and daring.
  • adjective Having or characterized by repeated successes.
  • adjective Fast and responsive.
  • adjective Unusually lucky.
  • adjective Music Of, relating to, or being an emotionally charged style of performance marked by strong rhythms and improvisation.
  • adjective Bold and bright.
  • noun Slang Strong sexual attraction or desire. Used with the.
  • adverb In a hot manner; hotly.
  • adverb While hot.
  • transitive verb Informal To cause to increase in intensity or excitement. Often used with up.
  • idiom (hot and bothered) In a state of agitated excitement; flustered.
  • idiom Informal (hot and heavy) Passionate or intense.
  • idiom (hot and heavy) Characterized by or engaging in amorous or sexual activity.
  • idiom (hot to trot) Sexually avid; lascivious.
  • idiom (hot to trot) Ready and willing; eager.
  • idiom (hot under the collar) Angry.
  • idiom (make it hot for) To make things uncomfortable or dangerous for.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A sort of basket used for carrying turf, earth, slate, etc.
  • noun An obsolete irregular (strong) past participle of hit.
  • Having the sensation of heat, especially in a high degree, the lower degrees being denoted by warm.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old English hāt; see kai- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old English hāt.

Examples

  • · At times you may suddenly feel very hot or sweaty (this is also called having ‘hot flashes’).

    Chapter 13

  • Hot water plates are very convenient, and easily procured at any large china shop; but if they cannot be found, put the hot plate containing the chop over a bowl of boiling water, and cover with a hot saucer, fold a napkin around the baked potato, and you can carry the tray containing the dinner through cold halls and up staircases and it will arrive at your patient's room _hot.

    Making Good on Private Duty

  • Absolutely clean napkins and tray cloths, a few green leaves about the plate, a rose on the tray; the chop or piece of chicken, the bird or the piece of steak ornamented with sprigs of parsley, the cold things really cold, and the hot ones _hot_, these are necessities of invalid's feeding, that mark the nurse who has a proper appreciation of a sick person's delicate sensibilities.

    Making Good on Private Duty

  • At all events, very _hot_ drink with nothing but water, milk and sugar, is equally efficacious, and my medicine (a few grains of sugar of milk) put into the hot water, seasoned as above, has often obtained great credit, when the _hot water_ was alone worthy.

    An Epitome of the Homeopathic Healing Art Containing the New Discoveries and Improvements to the Present Time

  • Hot water plates are very convenient, and easily procured at any large china shop; but if they cannot be found, put the hot plate containing the chop over a bowl of boiling water, and cover with a hot saucer, fold a napkin around the baked potato, and you can carry the tray containing the dinner through cold halls and up staircases and it will arrive at your patient's room _hot.

    Making Good on Private Duty

  • What I wanted was a hot Scotch and a hot chop and hot potatoes -- everything _hot_.

    At Home with the Jardines

  • Hot water plates are very convenient, and easily procured at any large china shop; but if they cannot be found, put the hot plate containing the chop over a bowl of boiling water, and cover with a hot saucer, fold a napkin around the baked potato, and you can carry the tray containing the dinner through cold halls and up staircases and it will arrive at your patient's room _hot.

    Making Good on Private Duty

  • Absolutely clean napkins and tray cloths, a few green leaves about the plate, a rose on the tray; the chop or piece of chicken, the bird or the piece of steak ornamented with sprigs of parsley, the cold things really cold, and the hot ones _hot_, these are necessities of invalid's feeding, that mark the nurse who has a proper appreciation of a sick person's delicate sensibilities.

    Making Good on Private Duty

  • Absolutely clean napkins and tray cloths, a few green leaves about the plate, a rose on the tray; the chop or piece of chicken, the bird or the piece of steak ornamented with sprigs of parsley, the cold things really cold, and the hot ones _hot_, these are necessities of invalid's feeding, that mark the nurse who has a proper appreciation of a sick person's delicate sensibilities.

    Making Good on Private Duty

  • Be sure, if you have French toast, hot cakes or waffles served, that they come from the kitchen _hot_.

    How to Prepare and Serve a Meal; and Interior Decoration

Comments

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  • "A small heap of any kind carelessly put up; a hot of muck, a hot of stones, &c." --Dr. Jamieson's Scottish Dictionary and Supplement, 1841.

    Also hott.

    May 20, 2011