Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To mock at or treat with derision.
  • intransitive v. To show or express derision or scorn.
  • n. An expression of derision or scorn.
  • transitive v. To eat (food) quickly and greedily.
  • intransitive v. To eat greedily.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Derision; ridicule; a derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach.
  • n. An object of scorn, mockery, or derision.
  • v. To jeer; laugh at with contempt and derision.
  • n. Food.
  • v. To eat food quickly.
  • v. To eat.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Derision; ridicule; mockery; derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach.
  • n. An object of scorn, mockery, or derision.
  • intransitive v. To show insolent ridicule or mockery; to manifest contempt by derisive acts or language; -- often with at.
  • transitive v. To treat or address with derision; to assail scornfully; to mock at.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An expression of contempt, derision, or mocking scorn; a taunt; a gibe; a flout.
  • n. An object of scoffing or scorn; a mark for derision; a butt.
  • To speak jeeringly or derisively; manifest mockery, derision, or ridicule; utter contemptuous or taunting language; mock; deride: generally with at before the object.
  • Synonyms Gibe, Jeer, etc. See sneer.
  • To treat with derision or scorn; mock at; ridicule; deride.
  • To eat hastily; devour.
  • n. Food; “grub.”
  • To steal; carry off.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. treat with contemptuous disregard
  • v. laugh at with contempt and derision
  • n. showing your contempt by derision

Etymologies

Middle English scoffen, from scof, mockery, probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Danish skof, jest, teasing.
Alteration of obsolete scaff.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English scof/skof, of Scandinavian origin. Compare Old Norse skaup, Danish skuffelse(noun)/skuffe(verb) and Old High German scoph. (Wiktionary)
From Afrikaans. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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