Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A long, narrow, generally shallow receptacle for holding water or feed for animals.
  • n. Any of various similar containers for domestic or industrial use, such as kneading or washing.
  • n. A gutter under the eaves of a roof.
  • n. A long, narrow depression, as between waves or ridges.
  • n. A low point in a business cycle or on a statistical graph.
  • n. Meteorology An elongated region of relatively low atmospheric pressure, often associated with a front.
  • n. Physics A minimum point in a wave or an alternating signal.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A long, narrow container, open on top, for feeding or watering animals.
  • n. Any similarly shaped container.
  • n. A short, narrow canal designed to hold water until it drains or evaporates.
  • n. A gutter under the eaves of a building; an eaves trough.
  • n. A channel for conveying water or other farm liquids (such as milk) from place to place by gravity; any ‘U’ or ‘V’ cross-sectioned irrigation channel.
  • n. A long, narrow depression between waves or ridges; the low portion of a wave cycle.
  • n. A linear atmospheric depression associated with a weather front.
  • v. To eat in a vulgar style, as if eating from a trough

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A long, hollow vessel, generally for holding water or other liquid, especially one formed by excavating a log longitudinally on one side; a long tray; also, a wooden channel for conveying water, as to a mill wheel.
  • n. Any channel, receptacle, or depression, of a long and narrow shape.
  • n. The transverse section of a cyclonic area where the barometric pressure, neither rising nor falling, has reached its lowest point.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In mining, an oblong tank of boards or metal in which ores are washed for the separation of metal and gangue; a rocker, serving as a hand-buddle.
  • n. In coalmining, a passage cut through a supporting pillar of coal to connect one opened chamber with another. Also called thirling.
  • n. In geology, the lowest portion of a synclinal fold.
  • n. An open receptacle, generally long and narrow, as for water.
  • n. A large vessel, usually oblong, designed to hold water or food for animals.
  • n. A conduit for rain-water, placed under the eaves of a building; an eaves-trough.
  • n. In printing:
  • n. A watertight box in which paper is dipped to dampen it for the press.
  • n. The iron or metal-lined box in which inking-rollers are cleaned and forms are washed.
  • n. In fish-culture, a hatching-trough.
  • n. A small boat; a canoe or dug-out.
  • n. A concavity or hollow; a depression between two ridges or between two waves; an oblong basin-shaped hollow: as, the trough of the sea.
  • n. The array of connected cells of a voltaic battery, in which the copper and zinc plates of each pair are on opposite sides of the partition.
  • n. In chem., a vat or pan containing water over which gas is distilled.
  • n. In electroplating, a tray or vat which holds the metallic solution.
  • n. A similar device for holding the developing or fixing bath in dry-plate photography, in order that the changes in the plate submerged in the bath can be observed.
  • To feed grossly, as a hog from a trough.
  • To make into a trough, or into the shape of a trough.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a long narrow shallow receptacle
  • n. a container (usually in a barn or stable) from which cattle or horses feed
  • n. a treasury for government funds
  • n. a concave shape with an open top
  • n. a narrow depression (as in the earth or between ocean waves or in the ocean bed)
  • n. a channel along the eaves or on the roof; collects and carries away rainwater

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English trog; see deru- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English trog, from Proto-Germanic *trugan, *trugaz (compare West Frisian trôch, Dutch trog, Swedish tråg), from Proto-Indo-European *dru-kó (compare Middle Irish drochta ("wooden basin"), Armenian targal, enlargement of *dóru (“tree”)). More at tree. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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