Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of various machines equipped with scooping or suction devices and used to deepen harbors and waterways and in underwater mining.
  • noun Nautical A boat or barge equipped with a dredge.
  • noun An implement consisting of a net on a frame, used for gathering shellfish.
  • intransitive verb To clean, deepen, or widen with a dredge.
  • intransitive verb To bring up with a dredge.
  • intransitive verb To come up with; unearth.
  • intransitive verb To use a dredge.
  • transitive verb To coat (food) by sprinkling with a powder, such as flour or sugar.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Formerly, same as meslin; now, specifically, a mixture of oats and barley sown together.
  • To clear out with a dredge; remove sand, silt, mud, etc., from the bottom of: as, to dredge a harbor, river, or canal.
  • To take, catch, or gather with a dredge; obtain or remove by the use of a dredge: as, to dredge mud from a river.
  • To make use of a dredge; operate with a dredge: as, to dredge for oysters.
  • To sprinkle flour upon, as roasting meat.
  • noun A bush-harrow; a large rake.
  • noun Any instrument for bringing up or removing solid substances from under water by dragging on the bottom.
  • noun An apparatus for bringing up marine animals, plants, and other objects from the bottom of the sea for scientific investigation. It consists principally of a frame of iron and a net which is attached to the frame. As generally constructed, the frame is transversely oblong, generally about three times as long as wide, with straight ends and slightly inclined sides, having the outer edges sharp to serve as scrapers. The net is usually composed of heavy twine, but sometimes of iron chainwork, and is attached to the frame by holes near the inner edges. Fastened to the frame are iron handles, to which a rope or iron chain is attached.
  • noun A machine for clearing the beds of canals, rivers, harbors, etc. See dredging-machine.
  • noun In ore-dressing, in certain mining districts of England, ore which is intermediate in rich ness between “prill-ore”; and “halvans”; ore of second quality, more or less intermixed with veinstone. Sometimes written dradge.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Any instrument used to gather or take by dragging; as: (a) A dragnet for taking up oysters, etc., from their beds. (b) A dredging machine. (c) An iron frame, with a fine net attached, used in collecting animals living at the bottom of the sea.
  • noun (Mining) Very fine mineral matter held in suspension in water.
  • noun obsolete A mixture of oats and barley.
  • transitive verb To catch or gather with a dredge; to deepen with a dredging machine.
  • transitive verb a machine (commonly on a boat) used to scoop up mud, gravel, or obstructions from the bottom of rivers, docks, etc., so as to deepen them.
  • transitive verb To sift or sprinkle flour, etc., on, as on roasting meat.
  • transitive verb (Gun.) A copper box with a perforated lid; -- used for sprinkling meal powder over shell fuses.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Any instrument used to gather or take by dragging; as:
  • noun Very fine mineral matter held in suspension in water.
  • verb to make a channel deeper or wider using a dredge
  • verb to bring something to the surface with a dredge
  • verb to unearth, such as an unsavoury past
  • verb to coat moistened food with a powder, such as flour or sugar

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a power shovel to remove material from a channel or riverbed
  • verb cover before cooking
  • verb search (as the bottom of a body of water) for something valuable or lost
  • verb remove with a power shovel, usually from a bottom of a body of water

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English dreg- (in dreg-boat, boat for dredging); akin to ; akin to Old English dragan, to draw.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[From obsolete dredge, a sweetmeat, from Middle English dragge, from Old French dragie, alteration of Latin tragēmata, confectionary, from Greek, pl. of tragēma, sweetmeat; see terə- in Indo-European roots.]

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