Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Damage or harm done to or suffered by a person or thing.
  • noun A particular form of hurt, damage, or loss.
  • noun Law Violation of the rights of another party for which legal redress is available.
  • noun Obsolete An insult.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To injure; hurt; harm.
  • noun That which injures; harm inflicted or suffered; mischief; damage; hurt.
  • noun Injurious speech; detraction; calumny.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Any damage or hurt done to a person or thing; detriment to, or violation of, the person, character, feelings, rights, property, or interests of an individual; that which injures, or occasions wrong, loss, damage, or detriment; harm; hurt; loss; mischief; wrong; evil

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Any damage or violation of, the person, character, feelings, rights, property, or interests of an individual; that which injures, or occasions wrong, loss, damage, or detriment; harm; hurt; loss; mischief; wrong; evil; as, his health was impaired by a severe injury; slander is an injury to the character.
  • verb obsolete To wrong, to injure.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun wrongdoing that violates another's rights and is unjustly inflicted
  • noun an act that causes someone or something to receive physical damage
  • noun a casualty to military personnel resulting from combat
  • noun an accident that results in physical damage or hurt
  • noun any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English injurie, from Anglo-Norman, from Latin iniūria, a wrong, injustice, from feminine of iniūrius, unjust : in-, not; see in– + iūs, iūr-, law; see yewes- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Anglo-Norman injurie, from Latin iniūria ("injustice; wrong; offense"), from in- ("not") + iūs, iūris ("right, law").

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.