Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The act or process of corrupting.
  • noun The state of being corrupt.
  • noun Decay; rot.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The act of corrupting, or the state of being corrupt or putrid; the destruction of the natural form of an organic body by decomposition accompanied by putrefaction; physical dissolution.
  • noun Putrid matter; pus.
  • noun Depravity; wickedness; perversion or extinction of moral principles; loss of purity or integrity.
  • noun Debasement or deterioration.
  • noun Perversion; vitiation: as, a corruption of language.
  • noun A corrupt or debased form of a word: as, “sparrow-grass” is a corruption of “asparagus.”
  • noun A perverting, vitiating, or depraving influence; more specifically, bribery.
  • noun In law, taint; impurity or defect (of heritable blood) in consequence of an act of attainder of treason or felony, by which a person is disabled from inheriting lands from an ancestor, and can neither retain those in his possession nor transmit them by descent to his heirs.
  • noun Synonyms Putrefaction, putrescence.
  • noun Pollution, defilement, contamination, vitiation, demoralization, foulness, baseness.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The act of corrupting or making putrid, or state of being corrupt or putrid; decomposition or disorganization, in the process of putrefaction; putrefaction; deterioration.
  • noun The product of corruption; putrid matter.
  • noun The act of corrupting or of impairing integrity, virtue, or moral principle; the state of being corrupted or debased; loss of purity or integrity; depravity; wickedness; impurity; bribery.
  • noun The act of changing, or of being changed, for the worse; departure from what is pure, simple, or correct.
  • noun (Law) taint or impurity of blood, in consequence of an act of attainder of treason or felony, by which a person is disabled from inheriting any estate or from transmitting it to others.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The act of corrupting or of impairing integrity, virtue, or moral principle; the state of being corrupted or debased; loss of purity or integrity; depravity; wickedness; impurity; bribery.
  • noun The act of corrupting or making putrid, or state of being corrupt or putrid; decomposition or disorganization, in the process of putrefaction; putrefaction; deterioration.
  • noun The product of corruption; putrid matter.
  • noun The decomposition of biological matter.
  • noun computing The destruction of data by manipulation of parts of it, either by deliberate or accidental human action or by imperfections in storage or transmission media.
  • noun The act of changing, or of being changed, for the worse; departure from what is pure, simple, or correct; as, a corruption of style; corruption in language.
  • noun linguistics A debased or nonstandard form of a word, expression, or text, resulting from misunderstanding, transcription error, mishearing, etc.
  • noun Something that is evil but is supposed to be good.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun decay of matter (as by rot or oxidation)
  • noun lack of integrity or honesty (especially susceptibility to bribery); use of a position of trust for dishonest gain
  • noun destroying someone's (or some group's) honesty or loyalty; undermining moral integrity
  • noun moral perversion; impairment of virtue and moral principles
  • noun inducement (as of a public official) by improper means (as bribery) to violate duty (as by commiting a felony)
  • noun in a state of progressive putrefaction

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From French corruption, from Latin corruptiō

Examples

  • It is true that original sin hath induced this corruption and incineration upon us; if we had not sinned in Adam, _mortality had not put on immortality_ [366] (as the apostle speaks), nor _corruption had not put on incorruption_, but we had had our transmigration from this to the other world without any mortality, any corruption at all.

    Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions Together with Death's Duel

  • (Sadly, Jesse Jackson, Jr., though he appears to not have been involved in corruption, is now too tainted in the public memory as candidate #6 or whatever to have a viable chance at filling the seat.)

    Matthew Yglesias » Darrel Thompson Sure Can Quit Burris

  • A report in Corriere della Sera on Wednesday said Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano used the term "corruption" in a letter to Pope Benedict XVI to explain the difficulties he faced in his position as secretary-general of the Vatican city-state.

    www.startribune.com

  • (He said he was not using the term corruption in the sense of bribes, but in a broader sense, as when governments waste millions of dollars because their hands are tied by union rules.)

    NYT > Home Page

  • (He said he was not using the term corruption in the sense of bribes, but in a broader sense, as when governments waste millions of dollars because their hands are tied by union rules.)

    NYT > Home Page

  • But the priest is not of the order of the Aaronic priesthood; Christ is understood to be that. (the New Testament word "Priest" is but the linguistic corruption from the Greek word Presbyter, meaning "elder" - which is a direct derivation from the Hebrew Zaqen, also meaning "elder").

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • "I don't use the term corruption lightly," McCain said.

    Boston.com Most Popular

  • But the priest is not of the order of the Aaronic priesthood; Christ is understood to be that. (the New Testament word "Priest" is but the linguistic corruption from the Greek word Presbyter, meaning "elder" - which is a direct derivation from the Hebrew Zaqen, also meaning "elder").

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • It posits that the trouble with NPR, which I call "corruption" in a general sense, is evidenced through the use of public choice theory.

    A Response To NPR's Rebuttal

  • And this corruption is a bipartisan project — perhaps the only bipartisan project that functions inside the beltway.

    Balloon Juice » Blog Archive » $3.47 billion spent. Did you get a pony?

Comments

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  • "All power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely." John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton, 1st Baron Acton (1834 - 1902)

    September 9, 2007