Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Present participle of maim.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The foot claws of some phorusrhacids also support the idea that they used their feet in maiming or killing as the claws are laterally compressed, curved and sharp-tipped.

    More on phorusrhacids: the biggest, the fastest, the mostest out-of-placest

  • The foot claws of some phorusrhacids also support the idea that they used their feet in maiming or killing as the claws are laterally compressed, curved and sharp-tipped.

    Archive 2006-11-01

  • The cruel, needless physical suffering as well as mental worry which such treatment had entailed, perhaps resulting in maiming her for life.

    Prisons and Prisoners: Some Personal Experiences

  • I think the common law term would be "maiming" rather than assault.

    "Ciomu's case is a dangerous precedent for all Romanian doctors."

  • Of course, the kind of maiming Mr. Cheney ordered goes far beyond anything practiced by the consenting adults who engage in BDSM activities, but I bet they still felt like he was giving a shout out at them.

    Archive 2005-10-30

  • Of course, the kind of maiming Mr. Cheney ordered goes far beyond anything practiced by the consenting adults who engage in BDSM activities, but I bet they still felt like he was giving a shout out at them.

    10/30/2005 - 11/06/2005

  • Of course, the kind of maiming Mr. Cheney ordered goes far beyond anything practiced by the consenting adults who engage in BDSM activities, but I bet they still felt like he was giving a shout out at them.

    Dick Cheney, BDSM Icon

  • That the women of the tribes were puzzles for him was perhaps a kind of maiming, though that thought was startling in it - self and he did not have time to consider it now.

    Merlin's Mirror

  • It seems to be a sort of rule, that no old sailor who has not lost a limb, or an eye at least, shall be eligible to the office; but as the kind of maiming is so far circumscribed that all cooks must have two arms, a laughable proportion of them have but one leg.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 14, No. 401, November 28, 1829

  • All of them were notorious criminals, who had been charged with every conceivable crime, from burglary to kidnapping and "maiming," and some not to be conceived of by the

    The Battle with the Slum

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