Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A deep fissure, as in a glacier; a chasm.
  • noun A crack or breach in a dike or levee.
  • intransitive & transitive verb To develop or cause to develop crevasses.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A fissure or crack: a term used by English writers in describing glaciers, to designate a rent or fissure in the ice, which may be of greater or less depth, and from an inch or two to many feet in width.
  • noun In the United States, a breach in the embankment or levee of a river, occasioned by the pressure of water, as in the lower Mississippi.
  • To rend, as the surface of a glacier, with fissures and cracks.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A deep crevice or fissure, as in embankment; one of the clefts or fissure by which the mass of a glacier is divided.
  • noun U.S. A breach in the levee or embankment of a river, caused by the pressure of the water, as on the lower Mississippi.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun literally A crack or fissure in a glacier or snow field; a chasm.
  • noun figuratively A discontinuity or “gap” between the accounted variables and an observed outcome.
  • verb intransitive To form crevasses.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a deep fissure

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[French, from Old French crevace, crevice; see crevice.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From French crevasse.

Examples

  • Across the crevasse was a bridge made of ropes, spangled with lights and tied to the crumbling ruins at either end.

    The Demons Covenant

  • Across the crevasse was a bridge made of ropes, spangled with lights and tied to the crumbling ruins at either end.

    The Demons Covenant

  • The crevasse was a great slit, deep into the standing cliff.

    The Gates of Thorbardin

  • The crevasse was a great slit, deep into the standing cliff.

    The Gates of Thorbardin

  • The crevasse was a great slit, deep into the standing cliff.

    The Gates of Thorbardin

  • On the far brink of the crevasse were the forms of men, who seemed to be waving their arms in the air and shouting.

    The People of the Mist

  • Twice I have owed safety to a snow bridge, and it seems to me that the chance of finding some obstruction or some saving fault in the crevasse is a good one, but I am far from thinking that such a chance can be relied upon, and it would be an awful situation to fall beyond the limits of the

    Scott's Last Expedition Volume I

  • Scientists have known for years that when the river flows free of its banks, in a phenomenon called a crevasse, land forms.

    The Seattle Times

  • Scientists have known for years that when the river flows free of its banks, in a phenomenon called a crevasse, land forms.

    KansasCity.com: Front Page

  • Scientists have known for years that when the river flows free of its banks, in a phenomenon called a crevasse, land forms.

    KansasCity.com: Front Page

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