Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To pull (a log) by horsepower over a level place in a slide.
  • To jerk; shake.
  • noun An illicit still.
  • noun A leaded hook or gang of hooks used without bait for catching fish by jigging. see jig, 6 .
  • noun A machine used for dyeing cloth. See jig-dyer.
  • noun In golf, a club with an iron head, between a mashy and a mid-iron, used for approaching.
  • noun In wireless telegraphy, a small transformer used for regulating and maintaining the difference of potential between the terminals of a coherer.
  • noun In the Royal Mint, a small weight which it is necessary, in certain cases, to add to a given number of coins to make an exact pound in weight.
  • noun One who or that which jigs.
  • noun A small, light, or light-running mechanical contrivance or utensil, causing or having when in use a rapid jerky motion; also, by extension, any subordinate mechanical contrivance or convenience to which no more definite name is attached.
  • noun A machine for hardening and condensing felt by repeated quick blows with rods, by the action of vibrating platens, or by intermittent rolling action on the material while warm and wet.
  • noun A small roller used in graining leather.
  • noun A templet or profile for giving the form to a pottery vessel as it revolves upon the wheel.
  • noun A potters' wheel when used for simple and rapidly made objects, as plain cylindrical vessels and the like.
  • noun A coopers' draw-knife
  • noun A warehouse-crane.
  • noun In coal-mining, a coupling-hook for connecting the cars or trams on an incline.
  • noun In billiards, a rest for the cue in making a difficult or awkward shot; a bridge.
  • noun A sort of small spanker-sail, set on a Jigger-mast in the stern of a canoe or other small craft, especially in Chesapeake Bay.
  • noun A door.
  • noun A small tackle composed of a double and single block and a fall, used about the decks of a ship for various purposes.
  • noun A sloop-rigged boat at one time used very extensively by the fishermen about Cape Cod, but superseded about 1829 by the dory.
  • noun A small street-railway car, drawn by one horse, and usually without a conductor, the driver giving change and the fare being deposited in a box.
  • noun A machine now generally used in the produce exchanges of American cities, which exhibits on a conspicuous dial the prices at which sales are made as the transactions occur. The hand or pointer is controlled by electric mechanism connected with a keyboard.
  • noun A drink of whisky.
  • noun The penetrating flea of the West Indies: same as chigoe.
  • noun In the United States, a name of sundry harvest-mites or harvest-ticks which, though normally plant-feeders, fasten to the skin of human beings and cause great irritation.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To move, send, or drive with a jerk; to jerk; also, to drive or send over with a jerk, as a golf ball.
  • noun (Zoöl.) A species of flea (Tunga penetrans, or Sarcopsylla penetrans, or Pulex penetrans), which burrows beneath the skin; called also jigger flea. See chigoe.
  • noun (Zoöl.), Southern U. S. Any one of several species of small red mites (esp. Tetranychus irritans and Tetranychus Americanus) of the family Trombiculidae, which, in the larval or leptus stage, burrow beneath the skin of man and various animals, causing great annoyance. Also called chigger.
  • noun One who, or that which, jigs; specifically, a miner who sorts or cleans ore by the process of jigging; also, the sieve used in jigging.
  • noun A horizontal table carrying a revolving mold, on which earthen vessels are shaped by rapid motion; a potter's wheel.
  • noun A template or tool by which vessels are shaped on a potter's wheel.
  • noun New Eng., New Eng. A light tackle, consisting of a double and single block and the fall, used for various purposes, as to increase the purchase on a topsail sheet in hauling it home; the watch tackle.
  • noun New Eng. A small fishing vessel, rigged like a yawl.
  • noun A supplementary sail. See Dandy, n., 2 (b).
  • noun A pendulum rolling machine for slicking or graining leather; same as Jack, 4 (i).
  • noun A small glass or measuring vessel holding 11/2 ounces (45 ml), used mostly for measuring liquor or drinking whiskey; also, the quantity of liquid held in a jigger.
  • noun colloq. A thingamajig.
  • noun (Naut.) The small mast set at the stern of a yawl-rigged boat.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A double-ended vessel, generally of stainless steel or other metal, one end of which typically measures 1 1/2 fluid ounces, the other typically 1 fluid ounce.
  • noun One who jigs; a miner who sorts or cleans ore by the process of jigging.
  • noun The sieve used in jigging ore.
  • noun A measure of 1 1/2 fluid ounces of liquor.
  • noun pottery A horizontal lathe used in producing flatware.
  • noun textiles A device used in the dyeing of cloth.
  • noun A pendulum rolling machine for slicking or graining leather.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • To suggest that making drinks using a jigger is the only way, and that it is more precise, is a completely false notion.

    Karl Kozel: Measure For Measure

  • To suggest that making drinks using a jigger is the only way, and that it is more precise, is a completely false notion.

    Karl Kozel: Measure For Measure

  • But, to suggest that making drinks using a jigger is the only way, and that it is more precise, is a completely false notion.

    Karl Kozel: Measure For Measure

  • But, to suggest that making drinks using a jigger is the only way, and that it is more precise, is a completely false notion.

    Karl Kozel: Measure For Measure

  • But, to suggest that making drinks using a jigger is the only way, and that it is more precise, is a completely false notion.

    Karl Kozel: Measure For Measure

  • But these new establishments and the consultants that come out of them are holding onto a tenet that says that not using a jigger is just sloppy bartending.

    Karl Kozel: Measure For Measure

  • I understand how one can derive that measuring with a jigger is more precise, and perhaps more profitable for beverage operations.

    Karl Kozel: Measure For Measure

  • But these new establishments and the consultants that come out of them are holding onto a tenet that says that not using a jigger is just sloppy bartending.

    Karl Kozel: Measure For Measure

  • I understand how one can derive that measuring with a jigger is more precise, and perhaps more profitable for beverage operations.

    Karl Kozel: Measure For Measure

  • I understand how one can derive that measuring with a jigger is more precise, and perhaps more profitable for beverage operations.

    Karl Kozel: Measure For Measure

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