Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To pass (something) again.
  • intransitive verb To cause to pass again in the opposite direction.
  • intransitive verb To pass again; go by again.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To pass or go back; move back: used specifically by conjurers or jugglers.
  • To pass again, in any sense.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb To pass or go back; to move back.
  • transitive verb To pass again; to pass or travel over in the opposite direction; to pass a second time

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To pass (back) again, especially in the opposite direction; to return.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Partly from Anglo-Norman repasser, partly from re- +‎ pass.

Examples

  • Another example most of the white staff members at my school didn't understand: The school secretary mentioned that there would be a "repass" on Friday and she'd be collecting money.

    languagehat.com: BLACK ENGLISH.

  • As the White House scrambles to try to find 216 votes in the House to repass health care, it continues to have a serious problem with elements of the rejectionist left:

    Matthew Yglesias » Defections from the Left

  • I use speed control and if some loses compression after he passes me, I will repass him and move into the right lane ahead of him.

    Coyote Blog » Blog Archive » I Thought I Was The Only Curmudgeon Who Obsessed Over This

  • After I did, I kept waiting for him to repass, but he never did.

    The Grace to Race

  • After I did, I kept waiting for him to repass, but he never did.

    The Grace to Race

  • After I did, I kept waiting for him to repass, but he never did.

    The Grace to Race

  • Their fellow natives pass and repass without noticing them or thought of bestowing aid or alms, and here it is not expected; they have passed beyond the pale of charity; it is the last ditch; they are here to die, not to receive alms.

    Archive 2009-09-01

  • Their fellow natives pass and repass without noticing them or thought of bestowing aid or alms, and here it is not expected; they have passed beyond the pale of charity; it is the last ditch; they are here to die, not to receive alms.

    Archive 2009-09-01

  • Their fellow natives pass and repass without noticing them or thought of bestowing aid or alms, and here it is not expected; they have passed beyond the pale of charity; it is the last ditch; they are here to die, not to receive alms.

    Dying in the Dying-field

  • Their fellow natives pass and repass without noticing them or thought of bestowing aid or alms, and here it is not expected; they have passed beyond the pale of charity; it is the last ditch; they are here to die, not to receive alms.

    Buttology 2

Comments

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  • Repass also shows up as a post-funeral event, similar to a wake. Or at least that's the way it is used in your twitter examples.

    January 4, 2010