Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The office, function, or authority of a master.
  • n. The skill or dexterity of a master.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The state of office of a master.
  • n. Mastery; dominion; superior skill; superiority.
  • n. Chief work; masterpiece.
  • n. A ironical title of respect.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The state or office of a master.
  • n. Mastery; dominion; superior skill; superiority.
  • n. Chief work; masterpiece.
  • n. An ironical title of respect.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state or office of a master; a master's position or rank: as, the mastership of a school, or of a vessel.
  • n. Masterly skill or capacity; superiority; mastery.
  • n. A chief work; a masterpiece.
  • n. In address, your mastership, like your lordship, etc. Sometimes contracted to maship.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the skill of a master
  • n. the position of master

Etymologies

master +‎ -ship (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • And in destroying them they attempted to honour God by something displeasing to Him; and to use the language of men, God was angry with all destroyers of the works of great mastership, which is only attained by much toil, labour, and expenditure of time, and is bestowed by God alone.

    Albert Durer

  • Shakespeare's dramas -- not all of them indeed, but those which were written after he reached what may be called his mastership -- are in the highest sense of term Works of Art, and as such embody to the full the principles set forth in the preceding section.

    Shakespeare: His Life, Art, And Characters, Volume I. With An Historical Sketch Of The Origin And Growth Of The Drama In England

  • Shakespeare's dramas ” not all of them indeed, but those which were written after he reached what may be called his mastership ” are in the highest sense of term Works of Art, and as such embody to the full the principles set forth in the preceding section.

    Shakespeare His Life Art And Characters

  • On the surface of the cloth stream that poured past him, he pictured radiant futures wherein he performed prodigies of toil, invented miraculous machines, won to the mastership of the mills, and in the end took her in his arms and kissed her soberly on the brow.

    THE APOSTATE: written by Jack London

  • I actually even think he had ultimately forgiven his persecutors and the slayers of his family -- and that would be a mastership that one can only view with awe.

    Mike Schwager: Remembering My Father: His Greatest Lesson to Me Was His Life

  • I think his existential themes and effects of philosophical confusion are very interesting, but other authors, such as Gene Wolfe, handle them with greater ease and mastership of style.

    Mind-Shattering Novels of Philip K. Dick

  • He holds that women must be kept in subjection, writing: "Woe unto the Race if ever these loveable creatures should break loose from mastership, and become the rulers or equals of Man."

    Essays

  • "Love, Women, and War" Redbeard opines that women "are incapable of self-mastership ... mere babies in worldly concerns."

    Essays

  • Regalo and he were a good match: Regalo could pass along his mastership of dealing with people and helping them on the Earth, and Raindance could contribute his sense of the mystery of life and ethereal beauty.

    When Animals Speak

  • His dream had been to get a headship eventually, or at any rate a senior mastership in a really first-class school; it was only gradually, after repeated trials and failures, that he realized the inadequacy of his qualifications.

    Education

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