Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The office of an ædile.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun historical The office of an aedile.
  • noun historical The period or duration of this office.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

aedile +‎ -ship

Examples

  • The aedileship was a magistracy through which it was ordinarily necessary to pass in order to reach the consulship; and as the aediles were expected to bear their own expenses, the consulship was thus restricted to those who could afford an extravagant outlay.

    Caesar: a Sketch

  • First, I drew up a large chart of the electorate for the aedileship.

    Imperium

  • The following year he would be thirty-six, just eligible to stand for an aedileship of Rome, of which four were elected annually.

    Imperium

  • First, I drew up a large chart of the electorate for the aedileship.

    Imperium

  • Finally, in the early evenings, accompanied by Quintus, Cicero resumed his visits to the tribal headquarters to canvass for the aedileship.

    Imperium

  • Finally, in the early evenings, accompanied by Quintus, Cicero resumed his visits to the tribal headquarters to canvass for the aedileship.

    Imperium

  • The following year he would be thirty-six, just eligible to stand for an aedileship of Rome, of which four were elected annually.

    Imperium

  • The fault of this disappointment he wholly ascribes to the populace, who, knowing his intimacy with king Bocchus, and for that reason expecting, that if he was made aedile before his praetorship, he would then show them magnificent hunting-shows and combats between Libyan wild beasts, chose other praetors, on purpose to force him into the aedileship.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • In his aedileship, a certain mischance brought him to the necessity of bringing an impeachment into the senate.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • Even if those bodies, considered merely as local boards, were far less objectionable than they are, the qualities that would fit them for the limited and peculiar duties of municipal or parochial aedileship are no guarantee of any special fitness to judge of the comparative qualifications of candidates for a seat in

    Representative Government

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