Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Skill in doing or making something, as in the arts; proficiency. See Synonyms at art1.
  • n. Skill in evasion or deception; guile.
  • n. An occupation or trade requiring manual dexterity or skilled artistry.
  • n. The membership of such an occupation or trade; guild.
  • n. A boat, ship, or aircraft.
  • transitive v. To make by hand.
  • transitive v. Usage Problem To make or construct (something) in a manner suggesting great care or ingenuity: "It was not the Chamber of Commerce that crafted the public policies that have resulted in a $26 billion annual subvention to the farmers” ( William F. Buckley, Jr.)

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Strength; power; might.
  • n. Ability; dexterity; skill, especially skill in making plans and carrying them into execution; dexterity in managing affairs; adroitness; practical cunning.
  • n. Cunning, art, skill, or dexterity applied to bad purposes; artifice; guile; subtlety; shrewdness as demonstrated by being skilled in deception.
  • n. A device; a means; an art; art in general.
  • n. The skilled practice of a practical occupation.
  • n. The members of a trade collectively; guild.
  • n. Implements used in catching fish, such as net, line, or hook. Modern use primarily in whaling, as in harpoons, hand-lances, etc.
  • n. Boats, especially of smaller size than ships. Historically primarily applied to vessels engaged in loading or unloading of other vessels, as lighters, hoys, and barges.
  • n. Those vessels attendant on a fleet, such as cutters, schooners, and gun-boats, generally commanded by lieutenants.
  • n. A vehicle designed for navigation in or on water or air or through outer space.
  • n. A particular kind of skilled work.
  • v. To make by hand and with much skill.
  • v. To construct, develop something (like a skilled craftsman): "state crafting", "crafting global policing".

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Strength; might; secret power.
  • n. Art or skill; dexterity in particular manual employment; hence, the occupation or employment itself; manual art; a trade.
  • n. Those engaged in any trade, taken collectively; a guild.
  • n. Cunning, art, or skill, in a bad sense, or applied to bad purposes; artifice; guile; skill or dexterity employed to effect purposes by deceit or shrewd devices.
  • n. A vessel; vessels of any kind; -- generally used in a collective sense.
  • transitive v. To play tricks; to practice artifice.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Strength; power; might.
  • n. Ability; dexterity; skill; especially, skill in making plans and carrying them into execution; dexterity in managing affairs; adroitness; practical cunning.
  • n. Specifically, cunning, art, skill, or dexterity applied to bad purposes; artifice; guile; subtlety.
  • n. A device; a means; an art; art in general.
  • n. A trade, occupation, or employment requiring the exercise of special skill or dexterity, especially of manual skill; a handicraft.
  • n. The members of a trade, collectively; a guild.
  • n. Nautical, a vessel; collectively, vessels of any kind.
  • n. See the extract.
  • To play tricks.
  • To use skill upon; manipulate.
  • Specifically, to build.
  • n. A Scotch form of croft.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. make by hand and with much skill
  • n. the skilled practice of a practical occupation
  • n. a vehicle designed for navigation in or on water or air or through outer space
  • n. shrewdness as demonstrated by being skilled in deception
  • n. people who perform a particular kind of skilled work
  • n. skill in an occupation or trade

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English cræft.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English, from Old English cræft ("physical strength, might, courage, science, skill, art, ability, talent, virtue, excellence, trade, handicraft, calling, work or product of art, hex, trick, fraud, deceit, machine, instrument"), from Proto-Germanic *kraftaz (“power”), from Proto-Indo-European *ger- (“to turn, wind”). Cognate with Eastern Frisian craft ("strength"), West Frisian krêft ("strength"), Dutch kracht ("strength, force, power"), German Kraft ("strength, force, power"), Swedish kraft ("power, force, drive, energy"), Icelandic kraftur ("power"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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