Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The quality of being acute or pointed; as, the acuteness of an angle.
  • n. The faculty of nice discernment or perception; sensitiveness; – applied to the senses, or the understanding. By acuteness of feeling, we perceive small objects or slight impressions: by acuteness of intellect, we discern nice distinctions.
  • n. Shrillness; high pitch; – said of sounds.
  • n. Violence of a disease, which brings it speedily to a crisis.
  • n. Shrewdness, quickness of mind

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The quality of being acute or pointed; sharpness.
  • n. The faculty of nice discernment or perception; acumen; keenness; sharpness; sensitiveness; -- applied to the senses, or the understanding. By acuteness of feeling, we perceive small objects or slight impressions: by acuteness of intellect, we discern nice distinctions.
  • n. Shrillness; high pitch; -- said of sounds.
  • n. Violence of a disease, which brings it speedily to a crisis.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The quality of being acute.
  • n. The faculty of nice discernment or perception; quickness or keenness of the senses or understanding.
  • n. In rhetoric or music, sharpness or elevation of sound.
  • n. In pathology, violence of a disease, which brings it speedily to a crisis.
  • n. In musical acoustics. relative elevation of pitch in a sound or tone, produced by greater frequency of vibration: opposed to gravity. The higher the pitch, the greater is the acuteness.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a quick and penetrating intelligence
  • n. the quality of having a sharp edge or point
  • n. a sensitivity that is keen and highly developed

Etymologies

acute +‎ -ness (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I may have been ever so much an exception in acuteness of observation, powers of comparison, and abnormal self-consciousness; none the less were my thoughts and conduct typical of the attitude of the intelligent immigrant child toward American institutions.

    The Promised Land

  • Her sense of touch has sensibly increased during the year, and has gained in acuteness and delicacy.

    The Story of My Life

  • Prudence -- but not the acuteness which is sometimes confused with prudence -- is incompatible with incontinence, which is least curable when the outcome of weakness.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 13 — Religion and Philosophy

  • Anxiety, hope, and even fatigue itself, had imparted to his body the fictitious strength of fever, and to his intellect the unhealthy acuteness which is so often the result of intense mental effort.

    Monsieur Lecoq

  • Agitated by these reflections, which put sleep at defiance, Esther continued at her post, listening with that sort of acuteness which is termed instinct in the animals a few degrees below her in the scale of intelligence, for any of those noises which might indicate the approach of footsteps.

    The Prairie

  • Chamber of Commerce: "The Americans, with their vast and almost incalculable resources, their acuteness and enterprise, and their huge population, which will probably be 100,000,000 in twenty years, together with the plan they have adopted for putting accumulated wealth into great cooperative syndicates or trusts for the purpose of carrying on this great commercial warfare, are the most formidable ... rivals to be feared."

    THE QUESTION OF THE MAXIMUM

  • He shaved hairs from the back of his hand, glanced along the edge with microscopic acuteness, and found, or feigned that he found, always, a slight inequality in its edge somewhere.

    Chapter 9

  • It was indeed but a passing trance, that only made me feel with renewed acuteness so soon as, the unnatural stimulus ceasing to operate, I had returned to my old habits.

    Chapter 3

  • Even with a different artist, the work is fresh and interesting, maintaining an acuteness to detail and accuracy, while Wood does his work in telling a story that may well have happened at some time in the eleventh century.

    2010 February 27 « The BookBanter Blog

  • For nearly 40 years, the Bronx-born creator of such paradigmatic city-set films as "King of New York," "The Addiction," "Bad Lieutenant" and "Ms. 45" has hop-scotched from Manhattan to Hollywood to Europe in order to realize features, documentaries, episodic television shows and shorts that expose the obsessive heart of human nature and urban life with emotional acuteness and gritty cinematic savvy.

    Out of the Bronx, a Savvy Cinematic Vision

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