Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A large merchant ship.
  • noun A fleet of ships.
  • noun A rich source or supply.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A fleet of ships.
  • noun A large merchant vessel, especially one carrying a rich freight.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A large ship, esp. a merchant vessel of the largest size.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A merchant ship.
  • noun A merchant flotilla, fleet.
  • noun Popular anglicism of the Argonautika of Apollonios Rhodios.
  • noun A collection of lore.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun one or more large merchant ships

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Alteration of obsolete ragusye, from Italian ragusea, vessel of Ragusa (Dubrovnik).]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Alteration of Italian ragusea ("a large ship"), after the maritime city of Ragusa, now Dubrovnik.

Examples

Comments

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  • a large merchant ship. Word derives from the port city of Ragusa, on the Adriatic (now Dubrovnik)

    February 26, 2007

  • Usage note on poop. No, really.

    March 16, 2008

  • ...this grand argosy we towed heavily forged along, as if laden with piglead in bulk.

    - Melville, Moby-Dick, ch. 64

    July 26, 2008

  • see argonaut also

    April 11, 2009

  • We are the deathless dreamers of the world.

    Errant and sad, our argosies must go

    On barren quests and all the winds that blow

    Lure us to battle where tall seas are hurled.

    - Walter Adolphe Roberts, 'The Dreamers'.

    September 23, 2009

  • Probably a sign of the word's modern relevance that almost all tweets come from gibberish engines.

    January 27, 2016

  • Note that there's also a lovely Ragusa in Sicily.

    January 27, 2016