Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The conscious use of the imagination in the production of objects intended to be contemplated or appreciated as beautiful, as in the arrangement of forms, sounds, or words.
  • noun Such activity in the visual or plastic arts.
  • noun Products of this activity; imaginative works considered as a group.
  • noun A field or category of art, such as music, ballet, or literature.
  • noun A nonscientific branch of learning; one of the liberal arts.
  • noun A skill that is attained by study, practice, or observation: synonym: skill.
  • noun Artful devices, stratagems, and tricks.
  • noun Artful contrivance; cunning.
  • noun Printing Illustrative material, especially in contrast to text.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun this sense?) (uncountable) Human effort to imitate, supplement, alter, or counteract the work of nature.
  • noun uncountable The conscious production or arrangement of sounds, colours, forms, movements, or other elements in a manner that affects the sense of beauty, specifically the production of the beautiful in a graphic or plastic medium.
  • noun uncountable Activity intended to make something special.
  • noun uncountable A re-creation of reality according to the artist's metaphysical value judgments.
  • noun uncountable The study and the product of these processes.
  • noun uncountable Aesthetic value.
  • noun uncountable, printing Artwork.
  • noun countable A field or category of art, such as painting, sculpture, music, ballet, or literature.
  • noun countable A nonscientific branch of learning; one of the liberal arts.
  • noun countable Skill that is attained by study, practice, or observation.
  • verb archaic Second-person singular simple present tense indicative of be.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old English eart; see er- in Indo-European roots.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin ars, art-; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English, from Old English eart ("(thou) art"), second-person singular present indicative of beon-wesan, from Proto-Germanic *ar-t (“(thou) art", originally, "(thou) becamest”), second-person singular preterite indicative form of *iranan (“to rise, be quick, become active”), from Proto-Indo-European *er-, *or(w)- (“to lift, rise, set in motion”). Cognate with Faroese ert ("art"), Icelandic ert ("art"), Old English earon ("are"), from the same preterite-present Germanic verb. More at are.

Examples

  • ATTRIBUTION: HILTON KRAMER, The New York Times art critic, in the late 1960s when the term “minimal art” was in vogue.

    Hilton Kramer (1928-)

  • NATURE, the art whereby God hath made and governs the world, is by the ‘art, ’ of man, as in many other things, so in this also imitated, that it can make an artificial animal.

    Introduction

  • Artistic and literary history is, therefore, _a historical work of art founded upon one or more works of art_.

    Aesthetic as Science of Expression and General Linguistic

  • Cellini’s use of the word arte for the art or trade of goldsmiths corresponds to “the art” as used by English writers early in this century.

    XIV

  • The only way in which art could disallow such criticism would be to protest its irresponsible infancy, and admit that it was a more or less amiable blatancy in individuals, and not _art_ at all.

    The Life of Reason

  • Every trade concerned with visible or audible objects or movements has also been an art; and every one of those great creative activities, for which, in their present isolation, we now reserve the name of _art_, has also been a craft; has been connected and replenished with life by the making of things which have a use, or by the doing of deeds which have a meaning.

    Laurus Nobilis Chapters on Art and Life

  • But, asks the reader, if every human activity resulting in visible or audible form is to be considered, at least potentially, as art; what becomes of _art_ as distinguished from _craft_, or rather what is the difference between what we all mean by art and what we all mean by

    Laurus Nobilis Chapters on Art and Life

  • Throughout the previous part of the world's history art and craft have been one and the same, at the utmost distinguishable only from a different point of view: _craft_ from the practical side, _art_ from the contemplative.

    Laurus Nobilis Chapters on Art and Life

  • The least of these illuminators, with his insignificant eyeless face, possesses at his fingers 'ends the maximum of dexterity in this art of decoration, light and wittily incongruous, which threatens to invade us in France, in this epoch of imitative decadence, and which has become the great resource of our manufacturers of cheap "_objects of art_."

    Madame Chrysantheme

  • 'Nature, the art whereby God hath made and governs the world, is by the _art_ of man, as in many other things, in this also imitated, that it can make an artificial animal.

    Mind and Motion and Monism

Comments

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  • A certain man was accosting people on the street and telling every other one, "Rather than just mindlessly attacking the arts, why not ask yourselves this:

    Does what I see, hear and read that other men produce make me feel better or not?"...

    One of the pedestrians so spoken to responded by saying,

    "Why not instead ask if what others produce artistically makes you feel more like a human or not?"

    And the man replied, "Would prove nothing."

    --Jan Cox

    November 18, 2007

  • "Art, like morality, consists of drawing the line somewhere." - G. K. Chesterton

    July 30, 2008

  • Watertown International Airport.

    October 24, 2008

  • “… when you do something and other people talk about it�?.

    — Liza Ghorbani, ‘Doing Things You’re Not’ New York Times (7 November, 2008)

    November 16, 2008

  • "Of what exactly are you a professor?"

    "Art."

    "OK, of what exactly art thou a professor?"

    May 8, 2009

  • Ha ha! That's a good 'un!

    Do you write your own gags, telofy?

    May 8, 2009

  • That one is my own creation. :-)

    The idea came to me when I read the sentences "What exactly are you a professor of, Mr. Logan?" – "Art."

    I just wasn't so sure about the "of". Someone clumsily trying to ancientize his sentence would probably also try and avoid preposition stranding but a reordering of the words would distract from the nub of the joke, so I changed that from the beginning.

    May 9, 2009