Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A revival of classical aesthetics and forms, especially.
  • noun A revival in literature in the late 1600s and 1700s, characterized by a regard for the classical ideals of reason, form, and restraint.
  • noun A revival in the 1700s and 1800s in architecture and art, especially in the decorative arts, characterized by order, symmetry, and simplicity of style.
  • noun A movement in music lasting roughly from 1915 to 1940 that sought to avoid subjective emotionalism and to return to the style of the pre-Romantic composers.
  • noun Any of various intellectual movements that embrace a set of traditional principles regarded as fundamental or authoritative.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The character of being neoclassic; revival of classic style in art or literature.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun a revival of the classical Greek and Roman style in art or literature.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun any of several movements in the arts, architecture, literature and music that revived forms from earlier centuries

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun revival of a classical style (in art or literature or architecture or music) but from a new perspective or with a new motivation

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The highest expression of nineteenth century neoclassicism is seen in the wonderful mural, based on Dante's Divine Comedy, by Jacobo Gálvez and Gerardo Suárez on the dome of the Degollado Theater.

    Murals come to life in the Florence of Mexico: Guadalajara

  • What this all led to, in a sense, was a movement that later was called neoclassicism, a kind of a going back to older forms, smaller forces, just cutting back, in general.

    Slimming Down the Classics

  • What this all led to, in a sense, was a movement that later was called neoclassicism, a kind of a going back to older forms, smaller forces, just cutting back, in general.

    Slimming Down the Classics

  • What this all led to, in a sense, was a movement that later was called neoclassicism, a kind of a going back to older forms, smaller forces, just cutting back, in general.

    Slimming Down the Classics

  • What this all led to, in a sense, was a movement that later was called neoclassicism, a kind of a going back to older forms, smaller forces, just cutting back, in general.

    Slimming Down the Classics

  • He thinks she found them old-fashioned: too dynamic and passionate, in contrast to the restrained neoclassicism that was becoming fashionable in the 1770s.

    The Path of 'Progress'

  • The works cover nearly three centuries, from the last years of the Renaissance around 1525 to the neoclassicism output in the 19th Century.

    Next Spring, it's La Dolce D.C.

  • Phoenix, Wolfgang Amadeus PhoenixAs we wrote behind in July, this is "retro cocktail hyper-focused upon a futuristic reimagination of postmodernism as good as neoclassicism as proletarian touchstones ... that we can dance to."

    The Best Albums Of 2009, In Bigger Than The Sound | Industry Fokery

  • The works cover nearly three centuries, from the last years of the Renaissance around 1525 to the neoclassicism output in the 19th Century.

    Visit the new Arts Post blog at washingtonpost.com/style. Music of defiance

  • It was influenced by neoclassicism but reinterpreted with her colors and shapes in a unique and never outdated way.

    The Decorator's Decorator

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