Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Of or relating to the Netherlands or its people or culture.
  • adjective Of or relating to the Dutch language.
  • adjective German.
  • adjective Of or relating to any of the Germanic peoples or languages.
  • adjective Of or relating to the Pennsylvania Dutch.
  • noun The people of the Netherlands.
  • noun Archaic A Germanic people.
  • noun The Pennsylvania Dutch.
  • noun The official West Germanic language of the Netherlands and one of the official languages of Belgium.
  • noun Archaic One or more of the West Germanic languages of Germany, Switzerland, and the Low Countries.
  • noun Slang Anger or temper.
  • idiom (go Dutch) To pay one's own expenses on a date or outing.
  • idiom (in Dutch) In disfavor or trouble.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To clarify and harden by immersing in heated sand, as goose-quills.
  • noun A form of the child's game of jumping the rope in which two ropes are used.
  • Of or pertaining to the Teutonic or German race, including the Low German (Low Dutch) and the High German (High Dutch). See II. Specifically
  • Of or pertaining to the Low Germans or to their language, particularly to the inhabitants of Holland; Hollandish; Netherlandish: formerly called specifically Low Dutch.
  • The word Dutch in this sense came to have in several phrases an opprobrious or humorous application, perhaps due in part to the animosity engendered by the long and severe contest for the supremacy of the seas waged by England and the Netherlands in the seventeenth century. See Dutch auction, courage, defense, etc.
  • Of or pertaining to the High Germans or to their language: formerly called specifically High Dutch.
  • noun The Teutonic or Germanic race; the German peoples generally: used as a plural.
  • noun Specifically The Low Germans, particularly the people of Holland, or the kingdom of the Netherlands; the Dutchmen; the Hollanders: called specifically the Low Dutch: used as a plural.
  • noun The High Germans; the inhabitants of Germany; the Germans: formerly called specifically the High Dutch: used as a plural.
  • noun The Teutonic or Germanic language, including all its forms. See 5, 6.
  • noun The language spoken in the Netherlands; the Hollandish language (which differs very slightly from the Flemish, spoken in parts of the adjoining kingdom of Belgium): called distinctively Low Dutch.
  • noun The language spoken by the Germans; German; High German: formerly, and still occasionally (as in the United States, especially where the two races are mingled), called distinctively High Dutch.
  • noun The common white clover, Trifolium repens: an abbreviation of Dutch clover.
  • noun [lowercase] A kind of linen tape.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The people of Holland; Dutchmen.
  • noun The language spoken in Holland.
  • adjective Pertaining to Holland, or to its inhabitants.
  • adjective See under Auction.
  • adjective a small, pound, hard cheese, made from skim milk.
  • adjective a kind of brick made in Holland. It is yellowish, very hard, and long and narrow in shape.
  • adjective (Bot.) common white clover (Trifolium repens), the seed of which was largely imported into England from Holland.
  • adjective [Slang] a so-called concert in which all the singers sing at the same time different songs.
  • adjective [Slang] the courage of partial intoxication.
  • adjective a door divided into two parts, horizontally, so arranged that the lower part can be shut and fastened, while the upper part remains open.
  • adjective a kind of brass rich in copper, rolled or beaten into thin sheets, used in Holland to ornament toys and paper; -- called also Dutch mineral, Dutch metal, brass foil, and bronze leaf.
  • adjective (Chem.) a thin, colorless, volatile liquid, C2H4Cl2, of a sweetish taste and a pleasant ethereal odor, produced by the union of chlorine and ethylene or olefiant gas; -- called also Dutch oil. It is so called because discovered (in 1795) by an association of four Hollandish chemists. See Ethylene, and Olefiant.
  • adjective a tin screen for baking before an open fire or kitchen range; also, in the United States, a shallow iron kettle for baking, with a cover to hold burning coals.
  • adjective chalk, or whiting dyed yellow, and used in distemper, and for paper staining. etc.
  • adjective (Bot.) a species of horsetail rush or Equisetum (Equisetum hyemale) having a rough, siliceous surface, and used for scouring and polishing; -- called also scouring rush, and shave grass. See Equisetum.
  • adjective a glazed and painted ornamental tile, formerly much exported, and used in the jambs of chimneys and the like.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English Duch, German, Dutch, from Middle Dutch Dūtsch; see teutā- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English Duch ("German, Low Countryman"), from Middle Dutch dūtsch, duutsc (modern Duits ("German")), northern variant of dietsc (compare modern Diets ("Dutch language")), from Proto-Germanic *þiudiskaz (compare German Deutsch ("German"), Old English þēodisc ("of the people")), from Proto-Germanic *þeudō ‘people’, from Proto-Indo-European *tewtéh₂. See also Derrick, Teuton, Teutonic.

Examples

  • Dutch (_see_ Netherlands) _Dutch New York_, Singleton, _q.

    All About Coffee

  • One evening I was among a group of people, I can't recall where or who or how, all I can remember is that a Dutch guy (with a stress on * Dutch*, coming from a place where you can be as rude as you want and get away with it) suddenly said: "I would forgive everything, but if I find out that my girlfriend poops, I will immediately break up with her".

    Mideast Youth - Thinking Ahead

  • The modern form was introduced in Britain by Dutch soldiers, who drank it during the Thirty Years' War hence the expression "Dutch Courage".

    An Adventurous Spirit

  • The difference in Dutch is that it's spelt with a small v and in Welsh it is a capital v.

    The Name is Welsh Just in Case

  • The word Dutch came from Deutsch, the German word for German.

    Essential Guide to Business Style and Usage

  • The word Dutch came from Deutsch, the German word for German.

    Essential Guide to Business Style and Usage

  • There was McMahon, agent for the Alaska Commercial Company, who had run across him in Dutch Harbor, and later on, among the outlying islands of the Aleutian group.

    A HYPERBOREAN BREW

  • There was McMahon, agent for the Alaska Commercial Company, who had run across him in Dutch Harbour, and later on, among the outlying islands of the Aleutian group.

    A HYPERBOREAN BREW

  • Bélica appears to be a typo or spell-check error for Bélgica (Belgium), for which it offers pages in Dutch and French.

    Alphabetical order

  • "And I've about come to the conclusion that there isn't very much in Dutch courage, after all."

    DUTCH COURAGE

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