Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. New England A young cod or haddock, especially one split and boned for cooking as the catch of the day.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A generic term for cod, pollock, haddock, or other whitefish.
  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of screw.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A young codfish, especially when cut open on the back and dressed.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To shred; prepare for cooking by tearing in small pieces: as, scrodded fish.
  • n. Scrodded fish, or a dish prepared by scrodding fish.
  • n. A young codfish, especially one that is split and fried or boiled.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. flesh of young Atlantic cod weighing up to 2 pounds; also young haddock and pollock; often broiled
  • n. young Atlantic cod or haddock especially one split and boned for cooking

Etymologies

Possibly from obsolete Dutch schrood, slice, shred, from Middle Dutch scrōde.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • Mackerel will broil in from twelve to twenty minutes, young cod (also called scrod) in from twenty to thirty minutes, bluefish in from twenty to thirty minutes, salmon, in from twelve to twenty minutes, and whitefish, bass, mullet, etc., in about eighteen minutes.

    Miss Parloa's New Cook Book

  • The "scrod" joke that I was referencing involved a Boston cabdriver.

    Blog updates

  • Look for anything with the texture needed to stand up to those big flavors, such as scrod, haddock, hake, or halibut; sea bass, or snapper work well too.

    Serious Eats

  • In the sentence “Where can I get scrod?”, the cabbie is apparently taking “get scrod” as the periphrastic passive voice of “screw”.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » More on Information About Prostitution

  • So he gets into a cab, and asks the driver, “Can you take me to where I can get scrod?”

    The Volokh Conspiracy » More on Information About Prostitution

  • VICE ADMIRAL: We are north of Boston, where the women lose their muscle tone playing bridge, making stupid jokes about how they like to go into Boston to get “scrod.”

    Nazi Muff-Diving: It Could've Happened Here

  • Bink looked like a baked scrod who'd just been — well, scrod.

    Matt Slade, Esq.--Pro Bono Czar

  • VICE ADMIRAL:   We are north of Boston, where the women lose their muscle tone playing bridge, making stupid jokes about how they like to go into Boston to get “scrod”.

    Nazi Muff-Divers: It Could've Happened Here

  • Today cod and its closest family members—Atlantic pollock, cusk (which is sold as scrod), haddock, hake (also sold as whiting)—are far less plentiful and more likely to be eaten fresh.

    One Big Table

  • Cod, haddock, scrod, or a thick cut of flounder are the best fish for this dish.

    One Big Table

Comments

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  • No-one's done the taxi driver joke yet? (Yes, I know dontcry was hinting at it. But this is a journal of record.)

    July 17, 2009

  • "Once freezing and filleting were put together, 'fish fillets' became a leading product. Scrod, a small cod fillet, became increasingly popular. The word was used in the United States at least as early as 1849, though its origin seems to be a Dutch word, schrode, meaning 'strip.' Once filleting became industrialized, scrod became a household word."
    —Mark Kurlansky, Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World (New York: Penguin, 1997), 137

    July 16, 2009

  • I thought it was the past-tense of scrad...

    October 16, 2008

  • Compare mystery bag.

    October 15, 2008

  • When seen on a Boston menu it can refer to any kind of white fish. Usually cod but no one's quite sure.

    October 15, 2008