Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To cause (an organism) to multiply or breed.
  • intransitive verb To breed (offspring).
  • intransitive verb To transmit (characteristics) from one generation to another.
  • intransitive verb To cause to extend to a broader area or larger number; spread.
  • intransitive verb To make widely known; publicize.
  • intransitive verb Physics To cause (a wave, for example) to move in some direction or through a medium; transmit.
  • intransitive verb To have offspring; multiply.
  • intransitive verb To extend to a broader area or larger number; spread.
  • intransitive verb Physics To move through a medium.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To multiply or continue by natural generation or reproduction; cause to reproduce itself: applied to plants and animals: as, to propagate fruittrees; to propagate a breed of horses or sheep.
  • To transmit or spread from person to person or from place to place; carry forward or onward; diffuse; extend: as, to propagate a report; to propagate the Christian religion.
  • To promote; augment; increase.
  • To produce; originate; invent.
  • To scatter; disperse.
  • Synonyms To increase, spread, disseminate.
  • To be multiplied or reproduced by generation, or by new shoots or plants; bear young.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb To have young or issue; to be produced or multiplied by generation, or by new shoots or plants.
  • transitive verb To cause to continue or multiply by generation, or successive production; -- applied to animals and plants
  • transitive verb To cause to spread to extend; to impel or continue forward in space.
  • transitive verb To spread from person to person; to extend the knowledge of; to originate and spread; to carry from place to place; to disseminate
  • transitive verb obsolete To multiply; to increase.
  • transitive verb To generate; to produce.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb transitive To cause to continue or multiply by generation, or successive production; -- applied to animals and plants; as, to propagate a breed of horses or sheep; to propagate a species of fruit tree.
  • verb transitive To cause to spread to extend; to impel or continue forward in space; as, to propagate sound or light.
  • verb transitive To spread from person to person; to extend the knowledge of; to originate and spread; to carry from place to place; to disseminate
  • verb obsolete, intransitive To multiply; to increase.
  • verb transitive To generate; to produce.
  • verb intransitive To have young or issue; to be produced or multiplied by generation, or by new shoots or plants; as, rabbits propagate rapidly.
  • verb intransitive, computing To take effect on all relevant devices in a network.
  • verb transitive, computing To cause to take effect on all relevant devices in a network.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb cause to propagate, as by grafting or layering
  • verb cause to become widely known
  • verb transmit
  • verb travel through the air
  • verb multiply sexually or asexually
  • verb transmit from one generation to the next
  • verb transmit or cause to broaden or spread
  • verb become distributed or widespread

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin prōpāgāre, prōpāgāt-; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

Examples

  • The lie that you propagate is that the ‘Filthy Left’, in which you lump everyone without a black shirt, are communists and therefore all part and parcel of the murderous history of communism.

    Think Progress » ThinkFast: May 19, 2006

  • This is an idea they might well want to propagate, which is where the word “propaganda” comes from.

    Right-wing propaganda revisited: A reply to readers

  • "A key advantage of graphene lies in the very high speeds in which electrons propagate, which is essential for achieving high-speed, high-performance next generation transistors," said T C Chen, vice president, science and technology, IBM Research.

    iTWire - IT and Telecommunications news views and jobs

  • "A key advantage of graphene lies in the very high speeds in which electrons propagate, which is essential for achieving high-speed, high-performance next generation transistors," said T C Chen, vice president, science and technology, IBM Research.

    iTWire - IT and Telecommunications news views and jobs

  • "A key advantage of graphene lies in the very high speeds in which electrons propagate, which is essential for achieving high-speed, high-performance next generation transistors," said Dr. T.C. C.en, vice president, Science and Technology, IBM Research.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • "A key advantage of graphene lies in the very high speeds in which electrons propagate, which is essential for achieving high-speed, high-performance next generation transistors," said Dr T C Chen, vice president, science and technology, IBM Research.

    Domain-b Brand Dossier

  • "A key advantage of graphene lies in the very high speeds in which electrons propagate, which is essential for achieving high-speed, high-performance next generation transistors," said Dr. T.C. C.en, vice president, Science and Technology, IBM Research.

    Tom's hardware UK

  • "A key advantage of graphene lies in the very high speeds in which electrons propagate, which is essential for achieving high-speed, high-performance next generation transistors," said Dr. T.C. C.en, vice president, Science and Technology, IBM Research.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • "A key advantage of graphene lies in the very high speeds in which electrons propagate, which is essential for achieving high-speed, high-performance next generation transistors," said Dr. T.C. C.en, vice president, Science and Technology, IBM Research.

    News Tom's Hardware US

  • "A key advantage of graphene lies in the very high speeds in which electrons propagate, which is essential for achieving high-speed, high-performance next generation transistors," said Dr. T.C. C.en, vice president, Science and Technology, IBM Research.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

Comments

New comments are temporarily disabled while we update our database.

  • Tissue cultures are isolated from a mushroom and propagated on a suitable substrate.

    January 24, 2011

  • Then click Save and wait approximately 15 seconds for the changes to propagate to the KDE menu.

    January 16, 2018