Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To walk or conduct oneself with an insolent or arrogant air.
  • intransitive verb To brag; boast.
  • noun A swaggering manner of moving or behaving.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Same as swagman, 2.
  • To strut with a defiant or insolent air, or with an obtrusive affectation of superiority.
  • To boast or brag noisily; bluster; bully; hector.
  • To influence by blustering or threats; bully.
  • Swell; all the rage.
  • noun The act or manner of a swaggerer; an insolent strut; a piece of bluster; boastfulness, bravado, or insolence in manner.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb rare To bully.
  • noun Australia A swagman.
  • intransitive verb To walk with a swaying motion; hence, to walk and act in a pompous, consequential manner.
  • intransitive verb To boast or brag noisily; to be ostentatiously proud or vainglorious; to bluster; to bully.
  • noun The act or manner of a swaggerer.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To walk with a swaying motion; hence, to walk and act in a pompous, consequential manner.
  • verb To boast or brag noisily; to be ostentatiously proud or vainglorious; to bluster; to bully.
  • noun confidence, pride
  • noun A bold, or arrogant strut.
  • noun A prideful boasting or bragging.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb to walk with a lofty proud gait, often in an attempt to impress others
  • adjective (British informal) very chic
  • verb discourage or frighten with threats or a domineering manner; intimidate
  • noun a proud stiff pompous gait
  • verb act in an arrogant, overly self-assured, or conceited manner
  • noun an itinerant Australian laborer who carries his personal belongings in a bundle as he travels around in search of work

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Probably frequentative of swag.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

A frequentative form of swag ("to sway"), first attested in 1590, in A Midsummer Night's Dream III.i.79:

Examples

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