merry-go-round love

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A revolving circular platform fitted with seats, often in the form of animals, ridden for amusement.
  • n. A piece of playground equipment consisting of a small circular platform that revolves when pushed or pedaled.
  • n. A busy round; a whirl: a merry-go-round of parties.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. carousel; a pleasure ride consisting of a slowly revolving circular platform affixed with various types of seats, frequently horses or other animals, typically found at fairs and amusement parks
  • n. a piece of playground equipment in the style of a merry-go-round
  • n. A dead-end search; a bustle of activity that gets nowhere

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Any revolving contrivance for affording amusement; esp., a group of seats in the shape of hobbyhorses or other fanciful animals, arranged in a circle on a platform that is rotated by a mechanical drive, often to the accompaniment of music; the seats often move up and down in synchrony with the rotation; -- called also carousel. It is employed primarily for the amusement of children, and is typically found at an amusement park.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A revolving machine, consisting of a series of wooden horses or carriage-seats, mounted on a circular platform, on or in which children and sometimes grown persons ride for amusement. In the United States also called a carrousel.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a never-ending cycle of activities and events (especially when they seem to have little purpose)
  • n. a large, rotating machine with seats for children to ride or amusement

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

Comments

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  • As they toured the fairgrounds the ole man noted to the kid, "You may consider you're getting somewhere when you can see the humor in the merry-go-round without ridiculing the riders." --Jan Cox

    November 16, 2007