Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A prostitute.
  • n. A person considered sexually promiscuous.
  • n. A person considered as having compromised principles for personal gain.
  • intransitive v. To associate or have sexual relations with prostitutes or a prostitute.
  • intransitive v. To accept payment in exchange for sexual relations.
  • intransitive v. To compromise one's principles for personal gain.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A prostitute.
  • n. A person who is considered to be sexually promiscuous (see also: slut).
  • n. A person who is unscrupulous, especially one who compromises their principles for gain.
  • n. A person who will violate behavioral standards to achieve something desired.
  • n. A contemptible person.
  • v. To prostitute oneself.
  • v. To engage the services of a prostitute.
  • v. To pimp; to pander.
  • v. To pursue false gods.
  • v. To pursue false goals.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A woman who practices unlawful sexual commerce with men, especially one who prostitutes her body for hire; a prostitute; a harlot.
  • intransitive v. To have unlawful sexual intercourse; to practice lewdness.
  • intransitive v. To worship false and impure gods.
  • transitive v. To corrupt by lewd intercourse; to make a whore of; to debauch.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A woman who prostitutes her body for hire; a prostitute; a harlot; a courtezan; a strumpet; hence, in abuse, any unchaste woman; an adulteress or fornicatress.
  • To prostitute one's body for hire; in general, to practise lewdness.
  • To corrupt by lewd intercourse.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. compromise oneself for money or other gains
  • v. work as a prostitute
  • v. have unlawful sex with a whore
  • n. a woman who engages in sexual intercourse for money

Etymologies

Middle English hore, from Old English hōre.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English hōre, from Proto-Germanic *hōrōn, from Proto-Indo-European *kāro- (“dear”); cognate with Old Norse hóra ("whore"), hórr ("adulterer"), German Hure ("whore"), Middle High German huore, Old High German huora, Dutch hoer. Non-Germanic cognates include Latin cārus ("dear"), Albanian koj ("to feed, lure, bribe") and Sanskrit काम (kāma, "love"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • What's so bad about a whore? Someone's got to pay the bills.

    August 15, 2007

  • Ah, bless your heart, for a sweet, pleasant—damn’d mischievous son of a whore.
    Goldsmith, She Stoops, I

    January 8, 2007