Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Blood, especially coagulated blood from a wound.
  • transitive verb To pierce or stab with a horn or tusk.
  • noun A triangular or tapering piece of cloth forming a part of something, as in a skirt or sail.
  • noun A small triangular piece of land.
  • transitive verb To provide with a gore.
  • transitive verb To cut into a gore.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Dirt; mud. [Prov. Eng.]
  • noun Blood that is shed or drawn from the body; thick or clotted blood.
  • noun A relatively long and narrow triangular strip or slip; a projecting point. Specifically
  • noun A triangular piece or tapering strip of land.
  • noun In Maine and Vermont, and formerly in Massachusetts, an unorganized and thinly settled subdivision of a county.
  • noun A triangular piece or strip of material inserted to make something, as a garment or a sail, wider in one part than in another; especially, in dressmaking, a long triangle introduced to make a skirt wider at the bottom or hem than at the waist. See goring.
  • noun A part of the dress; hence, the dress itself; a garment.
  • noun An angular plank used in fitting a vessel's skin to the frames.
  • noun In heraldry, a charge consisting of two curved lines, one from the sinister chief point, the other from the base middle point, meeting in an acute angle in the middle of the fesse-point. Also called gusset.
  • To pierce; penetrate with a pointed instrument, as a spear or a horn; wound deeply.
  • To scoop; dig.
  • To shape like a gore; cut or treat so as to form a gore.
  • To furnish with a gore or gores, as a dress-skirt or a sail.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun obsolete Dirt; mud.
  • noun Blood; especially, blood that after effusion has become thick or clotted.
  • transitive verb To cut in a traingular form; to piece with a gore; to provide with a gore.
  • noun A wedgeshaped or triangular piece of cloth, canvas, etc., sewed into a garment, sail, etc., to give greater width at a particular part.
  • noun A small traingular piece of land.
  • noun (Her.) One of the abatements. It is made of two curved lines, meeting in an acute angle in the fesse point.
  • transitive verb To pierce or wound, as with a horn; to penetrate with a pointed instrument, as a spear; to stab.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb of an animal To pierce with the horns.
  • noun A triangular piece of land where roads meet.
  • noun A triangular or rhomboid piece of fabric, especially one forming part of a three-dimensional surface such as a sail, skirt, hot-air balloon, etc.
  • noun An elastic gusset for providing a snug fit in a shoe.
  • noun A projecting point.
  • verb To cut in a triangular form.
  • verb To provide with a gore.
  • noun obsolete except in dialects Dirt, filth.
  • noun Blood, especially that from a wound when thickened due to exposure to the air.
  • noun Murder, bloodshed, violence.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun coagulated blood from a wound
  • verb wound by piercing with a sharp or penetrating object or instrument
  • noun the shedding of blood resulting in murder
  • verb cut into gores
  • noun a piece of cloth that is generally triangular or tapering; used in making garments or umbrellas or sails
  • noun Vice President of the United States under Bill Clinton (born in 1948)

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, filth, from Old English gor.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English goren, probably from gore, spear, from Old English gār.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old English gāra, triangular piece of land.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Probably from gore ("a projecting point"), or ultimately from Old English gār ("spear").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old English gor.

Examples

Comments

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  • a triangular piece of left-over land

    January 2, 2007

  • a triangular piece of fabric in a garment.

    July 12, 2007

  • a triangular piece of blood & guts ;-)

    July 12, 2007

  • Mmm, pot pie.

    July 12, 2007

  • Pot pie! I thought you were going to amend your ways!

    July 12, 2007

  • I think he's emending them instead--on paper. ;-)

    July 12, 2007

  • Touche. If I could tag, I would tag the e properly.

    July 12, 2007