Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Not stained strongly or definitely by either acid or basic dyes but stained readily by neutral dyes. Used especially of white blood cells.
  • noun A neutrophil cell, especially an abundant type of granular white blood cell that is highly destructive of microorganisms.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Physiol.) One of a group of leukocytes whose granules stain only with neutral dyes; it is the chief phagocytic leukocyte in the circulating blood, comprising from 54% to 65% of the total number of leukocytes.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective biology, medicine Of a cell: being more easily or more fully stained by neutral dyes than by acidic or alkaline (basic) ones.
  • noun biology, medicine Such a cell, especially a white blood cell.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the chief phagocytic leukocyte; stains with either basic or acid dyes

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[neutr(al) + –phil(e).]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From German Neutrophil, from neutro- ("neutro-") + -phil ("-phile").

Examples

  • Journal of Critical Care found that a new bedside blood test for a blood biomarker called neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) offered the promise of rapidly assessing if a critically ill patient is suffering from AKI.

    Medindia Health News

  • So they've done experiments where they've actually shined a laser at a neutrophil and it goes in the opposite direction.

    How Do Immune Cells Find Wounds?

  • According to Huff, the body loses its platelet and neutrophil supply and people can eventually die of bleeding.

    US Developing Radiation Sickness Drug

  • According to Huff, the body loses its platelet and neutrophil supply and people can eventually die of bleeding.

    US Developing Radiation Sickness Drug

  • So they've done experiments where they've actually shined a laser at a neutrophil and it goes in the opposite direction.

    How Do Immune Cells Find Wounds?

  • So they've done experiments where they've actually shined a laser at a neutrophil and it goes in the opposite direction.

    How Do Immune Cells Find Wounds?

  • Basic science research is being performed in the fields of NK cells, T cell function in atopic dermatitis, HIV, neutrophil biology, DiGeorge syndrome, and other fields in basic immunology as described above.

    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Fellowship

  • So they've done experiments where they've actually shined a laser at a neutrophil and it goes in the opposite direction.

    How Do Immune Cells Find Wounds?

  • Basic science research is being performed in the fields of NK cells, T cell function in atopic dermatitis, HIV, neutrophil biology, DiGeorge syndrome, and other fields in basic immunology as described above.

    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Fellowship

  • So they've done experiments where they've actually shined a laser at a neutrophil and it goes in the opposite direction.

    How Do Immune Cells Find Wounds?

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