Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Accumulated facts, traditions, or beliefs about a particular subject. See Synonyms at knowledge.
  • n. Knowledge acquired through education or experience.
  • n. Archaic Material taught or learned.
  • n. The space between the eye and the base of the bill of a bird or between the eye and nostril of a snake.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. all the facts and traditions about a particular subject that have been accumulated over time through education or experience.
  • n. The backstory created around a fictional universe.
  • n. workmanship
  • n. The region between the eyes and nostrils of birds, reptiles, and amphibians.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The space between the eye and bill, in birds, and the corresponding region in reptiles and fishes.
  • n. The anterior portion of the cheeks of insects.
  • Lost.
  • n. That which is or may be learned or known; the knowledge gained from tradition, books, or experience; often, the whole body of knowledge possessed by a people or class of people, or pertaining to a particular subject
  • n. That which is taught; hence, instruction; wisdom; advice; counsel.
  • n. Workmanship.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. That which is taught; instruction; counsel; admonition; teaching; lesson.
  • n. That which is learned; any store of knowledge; learning; erudition.
  • n. Synonyms Learning, Erudition, etc. (see literature), attainments, acquirements.
  • n. Preterit and past participle of Ieese.
  • n. Loss.
  • n. Anything suggesting a thong.
  • n. In ornithology, the side of the head between the eye and the base of the upper mandible.
  • n. In herpetology, a region on the side of the head between the eye and the nostril, where certain plates called lorals may be present.
  • n. In entomology, a corneous angular process in the mouth of some insects, by means of which the trophi are put forth or retracted. Also lora.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. knowledge gained through tradition or anecdote

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English lār; see leis-1 in Indo-European roots.
Latin lōrum, thong.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Old English lār, from West Germanic *laizā, from *lais- ‘to teach’. Cognate with Dutch leer, German Lehre. (Wiktionary)
From Latin lorum ("thong, strap") (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • The space between the eye and the base of the bill of a bird

    January 4, 2010

  • 971 Blickl. Hom. 47 Ne sceolan tha lareowas aasgimeleasian tha lare.

    June 28, 2008