Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Opinion about what could or should be done about a situation or problem; counsel.
  • noun Information communicated; news.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun An opinion recommended, or offered, as worthy to be followed; counsel; suggestion.
  • noun Deliberate consideration; reflection; cogitation.
  • noun Information; notice; intelligence; a communication, especially from a distance, containing information: as, to receive advice of a coming storm, or advices from abroad.
  • noun Specifically In com., a notification by one person to another in respect to a business transaction in which they are mutually engaged, as information given by one party to another, by letter, as to the bills or drafts drawn upon him; formal official notice.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun An opinion recommended or offered, as worthy to be followed; counsel.
  • noun obsolete Deliberate consideration; knowledge.
  • noun Information or notice given; intelligence; ; -- commonly in the plural.
  • noun (Crim. Law) Counseling to perform a specific illegal act.
  • noun a vessel employed to carry dispatches or to reconnoiter; a dispatch boat.
  • noun To consult with another or others.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun An opinion recommended or offered, as worthy to be followed; counsel.
  • noun obsolete Deliberate consideration; knowledge.
  • noun Information or notice given; intelligence; as, late advices from France; commonly in the plural. In commercial language, advice usually means information communicated by letter; used chiefly in reference to drafts or bills of exchange; as, a letter of advice.
  • noun law Counseling to perform a specific illegal act.
  • noun computing, programming In aspect-oriented programming, the code whose execution is triggered when a join point is reached.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a proposal for an appropriate course of action

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English avis, advice, from Old French avis, from (ester) a vis, to seem : a, to (from Latin ad; see ad–) + vis, seen (from Latin vīsum, what seems (good), from neuter past participle of vidēre, to see; see weid- in Indo-European roots).]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French avis, from the Old French phrase ce m'est a vis ("in my view"), where vis is from Latin visum, past participle of videre ("to see"). See vision, and confer avise, advise. The unhistoric -d- was introduced in English 15c.

Examples

Comments

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  • My teacher helps me by giving advise when I have some problems.

    March 22, 2007

  • Plural of advouse.

    June 26, 2008

  • I'd never seen 'advice' used as a count noun before, but came across it twice yesterday. It's so used in legal circles, e.g.

    undertaking legal research, drafting advices, pleadings and skeleton arguments

    Barristers' advices, opinions and professional correspondence are generally confidential and may attract legal professional privilege

    August 12, 2008

  • Like this.

    August 1, 2009

  • or this

    August 1, 2009

  • I can't believe that! If it's not fake, I'd like to know what happened to Miriam afterwards. :)

    August 1, 2009

  • It's fake. It was to illustrate a point about men being bad listeners. Hurr, hurr.

    August 1, 2009

  • "n. Information; notice; intelligence; a communication, especially from a distance, containing information: as, to receive advice of a coming storm, or advices from abroad." --CD&C

    No wonder they put advice columns in newspapers.

    April 18, 2012