Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A pig, especially a young pig, or its meat; sometimes specifically, a breed of wild pig or boar native to Scotland, now extinct.
  • n. A gree; a step.
  • v. to act as a trainspotter; to partake in the activity or hobby of trainspotting.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old Norse gríss.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Unknown, possibly from Richard Grice, the first champion trainspotter, alternatively perhaps a humorous representation of an upper-class pronunciation of grouser ("grouse-shooter"). In either case the derivation could be direct or a back-formation from gricer.

Examples

  • Over a quarter of a century ago I was a jolly, singing, hoop-pee mill-boy, and carried many a "grice" to William Easley's tub-mill on "Little Fish River," kept by my old friend Larkin Snow.

    Fisher's River (North Carolina) Scenes and Characters

  • So that an experienced cavalier, knowing how to lay, as our Scottish phrase runs, ‘the head of the sow to the tail of the grice,’ might get out of the country the pay whilk he could not obtain from the

    A Legend of Montrose

  • I agree, the refiners are holding all of us up! lewis w. grice

    Letter to Any Politician Who Gives a ‘You Know What’

  • Gri feeled of the scripes he would escipe if by grice he had luck enoupes.

    Finnegans Wake

  • Some figures of gas consumption from India: Boiling 1 l of water: 40 l; boiling 5 l of water 165 l; cooking 500 grice: 140 l; cooking 1000 g rice: 175 l; cooking 350 9 pulses: 270

    14. Appendix

  • Grice -- why not? plural of mouse, mice -- grice, we say, are growing more absent, and therefore dearer.

    Punch, Or The London Charivari, Volume 102, January 16, 1892

  • "Marcassin, a young wild boare; a shoot or grice."

    The Romance of Names

  • Head of the sow to the tail of the grice, to take the good with the bad.

    The Black Dwarf

  • I'se ne'er deny I hae won by ye mony a fair pund sterling --- Sae, an it come to the warst, I'se een lay the head o 'the sow to the tail o' the grice. ''

    Rob Roy

  • So that an experienced cavalier, knowing how to lay, as our Scottish phrase runs, ` the head of the sow to the tail of the grice, might get out of the country the pay whilk he could not obtain from the Emperor. ''

    A Legend of Montrose

Comments

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  • a young pig

    February 26, 2008