Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The collection of ancient Rabbinic writings consisting of the Mishnah and the Gemara, constituting the basis of religious authority in Orthodox Judaism.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In Jewish lit., the body of traditionary laws, precepts, and interpretations contained in the Mishnah and its complement or completion called the Gemara, the former being the text on which the latter is based.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The body of the Jewish civil and canonical law not comprised in the Pentateuch.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A collection of Jewish writings related to the practical application of Judaic law and tradition (may refer to either the Babylonian Talmud or the shorter Jerusalem Talmud).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the collection of ancient rabbinic writings on Jewish law and tradition (the Mishna and the Gemara) that constitute the basis of religious authority in Orthodox Judaism

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Mishnaic Hebrew talmûd, learning, instruction, from Hebrew lāmad, to learn; see lmd in Semitic roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Hebrew תלמוד (talmud, "instruction, learning").

Examples

  • As far as I am aware they are not included in any English translation of the Talmud, but may be found in an English version of Dr. Gustav H. Dalman's book, _Jesus Christus im Talmud_

    Secret Societies And Subversive Movements

  • There are two distinct works to which the title Talmud is applied; the one is the

    Chapters on Jewish Literature

  • Written Law, the Talmud is the vast compilation of the Oral Law, including rabbinical commentaries and elaborations.

    Elie Wiesel - Nobel Lecture

  • The Talmud is the less-than-absolute books of law.

    Carry-Over Thread

  • What is usually called the Talmud consists of two parts: 1.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 13 — Religion and Philosophy

  • Indeed, throughout the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the word Talmud appears as a synonym for something imaginative and unreal if not actually absurd.

    VERBATIM: The Language Quarterly Vol V No 3

  • During the Roman occupation and subsequent exile, this body of knowledge was committed to writing as an emergency measure and was formalized into what is now known as the Talmud (authoritative case law, ethics, mysticism and ritual practice), the Midrashim (homiletical stories) and the Kabbalah.

    Rabbi Adam Jacobs: The Essential Jewish Canon

  • During the Roman occupation and subsequent exile, this body of knowledge was committed to writing as an emergency measure and was formalized into what is now known as the Talmud (authoritative case law, ethics, mysticism and ritual practice), the Midrashim (homiletical stories) and the Kabbalah.

    Rabbi Adam Jacobs: The Essential Jewish Canon

  • During the Roman occupation and subsequent exile, this body of knowledge was committed to writing as an emergency measure and was formalized into what is now known as the Talmud (authoritative case law, ethics, mysticism and ritual practice), the Midrashim (homiletical stories) and the Kabbalah.

    Rabbi Adam Jacobs: The Essential Jewish Canon

  • During the Roman occupation and subsequent exile, this body of knowledge was committed to writing as an emergency measure and was formalized into what is now known as the Talmud (authoritative case law, ethics, mysticism and ritual practice), the Midrashim (homiletical stories) and the Kabbalah.

    Rabbi Adam Jacobs: The Essential Jewish Canon

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