Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The style of writing often held to be characteristic of newspapers and magazines, distinguished by clichés, sensationalism, and triteness of thought.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A style of writing fit only for rapid newspaper work; a style abounding in pretentious words and sudden colloquialisms and making crude bids for popularity.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun the linguistic style in which newspapers are written.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A style of writing used in some newspapers and magazines, characterized by cliché, hyperbolic language and clipped syntax.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the style in which newspapers are written

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

journal +‎ -ese

Examples

  • This reminds me of the to-do a few years back (late 20th-early 21st century) when someone Chinese decided that the suffix '-ese' had a derogatory meaning in English (as in 'journalese').

    languagehat.com: CHINESE 'JEW.'

  • QUOTE ABOVE: This reminds me of the to-do a few years back (late 20th-early 21st century) when someone Chinese decided that the suffix '-ese' had a derogatory meaning in English (as in 'journalese').

    languagehat.com: CHINESE 'JEW.'

  • This, of course, leads to that particular form of "journalese" in which a cricket-ball becomes a "leathern missile" and so forth.

    The Adventure of Living : a Subjective Autobiography

  • "journalese;" and as the picturesque reporter is a greater power in

    America To-day, Observations and Reflections

  • Mexican journalese (newspaper language) often features words that are perfectly well known but little used in conversation.

    Hito

  • Mexican journalese (newspaper language) often features words that are perfectly well known but little used in conversation.

    Hito

  • Mexican journalese (newspaper language) often features words that are perfectly well known but little used in conversation.

    Hito

  • Mexican journalese (newspaper language) often features words that are perfectly well known but little used in conversation.

    Hito

  • Mexican journalese (newspaper language) often features words that are perfectly well known but little used in conversation.

    Hito

  • "Is sufficiently — er — journalese?" he interrupted suavely.

    Local Color

Comments

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