Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A little mount; a hillock.
  • noun Also monticule.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A little mount; a hillock; a small elevation or prominence.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun archaic A small mountain, or hillock

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin monticulus, diminutive of mons, montis, mountain: compare French monticule. See mount (noun).

Examples

  • Turning round the corner of a hill, I observed through the mists of evening, which began to gather about me, what seemed to be rather a genteel house on the roadside; on my left, and a little way behind it a strange kind of monticle, on which I thought I observed tall upright stones.

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • There he stood on the monticle, preaching to weather-worn fishermen and mariners gathered below upon the sand.

    Lavengro

  • On the top of this hill or monticle in a timber house dwelt the great Welshman Owen

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • The monticle stands not far from the western extremity of the valley, nearly midway between two hills which confront each other north and south, the one to the south being the hill which I had descended, and the other a beautiful wooded height which is called in the parlance of the country Llwyn Sycharth or the grove of

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • Shortly after leaving him, I turned from the road to inspect a monticle which appeared to me to have something of the appearance of a burial heap.

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • It is the remains of what was once a Norman stronghold, and is perched upon a round mound or monticle, in the midst of the old city.

    Lavengro

  • And as I departed, I waved my hand to him on the monticle, and I shouted,

    Lavengro

  • We thanked her and proceeded to mount the hill or monticle once the residence of the great Welsh chieftain, whom his own deeds and the pen of Shakespear have rendered immortal.

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • He stood on the top of a steep monticle, used by pilots as a look-out for vessels approaching that coast, a dangerous one, abounding in rocks and quick-sands.

    Lavengro

  • Descending the monticle we walked along the road together.

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

Comments

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  • cf. hillock

    June 23, 2009