Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A bag typically made of net fabric that is worn at the back of the head to keep a woman's hair in place.
  • noun A headband or fillet.
  • noun A fleshy wrinkled fold of skin that hangs down over a turkey's beak.
  • transitive verb To hold (the hair) in place with a snood.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A fillet formerly worn by young women in Scotland to confine the hair. It was held to be emblematic of maidenhood or virginity.
  • noun In angling, a hair-line, gut, or silk cord by which a fish-hook is fastened to the line; a snell; a leader or trace Also sneed.
  • noun One of the short lines of a bultow to which the hooks are attached: also called by fishermen ganging. The snoods are 6 feet long, and placed at intervals of 12 feet.
  • To bind up with a snood, as a maiden's hair.
  • To tie, fasten, or affix, as an anglers' hook when the end of the line or gut-loop is seized on to the shank of the hook.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb Scot. To bind or braid up, as the hair, with a snood.
  • noun Scot. The fillet which binds the hair of a young unmarried woman, and is emblematic of her maiden character.
  • noun A short line (often of horsehair) connecting a fishing line with the hook; a snell; a leader.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A band or ribbon for keeping the hair in place, including the hair-band formerly worn in Scotland and northern England by young unmarried women.
  • noun A small hairnet or cap worn by women to keep their hair in place.
  • noun The flap of red skin on the beak of a male turkey.
  • noun A short line of horsehair, gut, monofilament, etc., by which a fishhook is attached to a longer (and usually heavier) line; a snell.
  • noun A piece of clothing to keep the neck warm; neckwarmer.
  • verb To keep the hair in place with a snood.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun an ornamental net in the shape of a bag that confines a woman's hair; pins or ties at the back of the head

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English snod, headband, from Old English snōd; see (s)nē- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old English snōd.

Examples

  • Another popular style of the 30s and 40s was the snood, which is sort of like a hammock for your hair worn at the back of your neck.

    Popular Hairstyles of the 20th Century

  • Another popular style of the 30s and 40s was the snood, which is sort of like a hammock for your hair worn at the back of your neck.

    Archive 2008-02-01

  • A piece of scarlet embroidered cloth, called the snood, confined her hair, which fell over it in a profusion of rich dark curls.

    Waverley

  • A piece of scarlet embroidered cloth, called the snood, confined her hair, which fell over it in a profusion of rich dark curls.

    The Waverley

  • To each line were fastened eight or ten snoods: a snood is a short line with a hook at the end.

    A Yacht Voyage Round England

  • A piece of scarlet embroidered cloth, called the snood, confined her hair, which fell over it in a profusion of rich dark curls.

    Waverley: or, 'Tis sixty years since

  • A piece of scarlet embroidered cloth, called the snood, confined her hair, which fell over it in a profusion of rich dark curls.

    Waverley

  • A piece of scarlet embroidered cloth, called the snood, confined her hair, which fell over it in a profusion of rich dark curls.

    Waverley — Complete

  • A piece of scarlet embroidered cloth, called the snood, confined her hair, which fell over it in a profusion of rich dark curls.

    Waverley — Volume 1

  • Stennie, I like the "snood" line, too, and the "Sisters" number as performed by both the boys and the girls.

    Ten Things I Like about White Christmas (1954)

Comments

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  • The pendulous skin over the beak of a turkey

    November 22, 2007

  • The shape of a handlebar moustache may be protected during the night by a moustache snood.

    In another (more Scottish) universe, the past tense for snow?

    March 6, 2009

  • Also a knitted piece of neckwear worn by football players. See here.

    February 5, 2011

  • Scots cockernonny.

    May 27, 2011

  • Looking moodily down into the heaving contents of the snood. Stella Gibbons Cold Comfort Farm. Yet again none the wiser - porridge in a snnod?

    February 18, 2013

  • Try reading the definitions above or the citations below.

    February 18, 2013