Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Alternative form of cramoisie.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Therewith he rose to his feet; but the boy caught hold of him, saying, “Look at the fairness of my face and the cramoisy of my cheeks and the softness of my sides and the lusciousness of my lips.”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • The day came, August 20th, and Mustafa himself, in his coat of inlaid mail and robe of cramoisy, led his army forward; but a well-directed fire drove him into a trench, whence he emerged not till night covered his path.

    The Story of the Barbary Corsairs

  • The duchess carried her grandchild to the font, -- a font draped with cramoisy velvet.

    Charles the Bold Last Duke of Burgundy, 1433-1477

  • Mons., the chancellor, clad in velvet over velvet cramoisy, first pronounced a discourse in beautiful Latin as a response to what had been said by the seigneur of Mayence.

    Charles the Bold Last Duke of Burgundy, 1433-1477

  • The emperor wore a rich robe of cloth of gold of cramoisy, and his son was in a robe of green damask.

    Charles the Bold Last Duke of Burgundy, 1433-1477

  • Standing erect on the poop, conspicuous in his cramoisy doublet, the tall figure of the old admiral was seen for an hour and a half directing the conflict, sword in hand, an easy mark for sharpshooters, as a wound in the knee reminded him.

    The Story of the Barbary Corsairs

  • Each gentleman escorted a dame wearing a coat of satin cramoisy over a fur-edged round skirt _à la Portuguaise.

    Charles the Bold Last Duke of Burgundy, 1433-1477

  • Mons., the chancellor, clad in velvet over velvet cramoisy, first pronounced a discourse in beautiful Latin as a response to what had been said by the seigneur of Mayence.

    Charles the Bold

  • Each gentleman escorted a dame wearing a coat of satin cramoisy over a fur-edged round skirt a la Portuguaise.

    Charles the Bold

  • The emperor wore a rich robe of cloth of gold of cramoisy, and his son was in a robe of green damask.

    Charles the Bold

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