Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To strip, as of clothes.
  • transitive v. To deprive, as of rights or property; dispossess.
  • transitive v. To free of; rid: "Most secretive of men, let him at last divest himself of secrets, both his and ours” ( Brendan Gill).
  • transitive v. To sell off or otherwise dispose of (a subsidiary company or an investment).
  • transitive v. Law To devest.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To undress, disrobe.
  • v. To strip, deprive, or dispossess (someone) of something (such as a right, passion, privilege, or prejudice).
  • v. To sell off or be rid of through sale, especially of a subsidiary

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To unclothe; to strip, as of clothes, arms, or equipage; -- opposed to invest.
  • transitive v. Fig.: To strip; to deprive; to dispossess
  • transitive v. See Devest.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To strip of clothes, arms, or equipage; hence, to strip of anything that surrounds or attends; despoil: opposed to invest: as, to divest one of his reputation.
  • To strip by some definite or legal process; deprive: as, to divest a person of his rights or privileges; to divest one of title or property.
  • To strip off; throw off.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. remove (someone's or one's own) clothes
  • v. reduce or dispose of; cease to hold (an investment)
  • v. deprive of status or authority
  • v. take away possessions from someone

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Alteration (influenced by Medieval Latin dīvestīre, to undress) of devest.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Alteration of devest, after Latin divestire.

Examples

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