Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To eject from a position or place; force out: "the American Revolution, which ousted the English” ( Virginia S. Eifert).
  • transitive v. To take the place of, especially by force; supplant. See Synonyms at eject.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To expel; to remove.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. See oast.
  • transitive v. To take away; to remove.
  • transitive v. To eject; to expel; to turn out.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To take away; remove.
  • To turn out; eject; dispossess.
  • n. Same as oast.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. remove and replace
  • v. remove from a position or office

Etymologies

Middle English ousten, from Anglo-Norman ouster, from Latin obstāre, to hinder; see obstacle.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Anglo-Norman ouster, oustier, from Old French oster ( > modern ôter), from post-classical Latin obstare ("to remove"), classical obstāre ("to obstruct, stand in the way of"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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