alexz has looked up 20178 words, created 150 lists, listed 14422 words, written 2862 comments, added 3 tags, and loved 214 words.

Comments by alexz

  • to kitesurf using a board that has a hydrofoil on it, so the rider is lifted out of the water.
    kitefoiling spotted in a Kitefoiling on Maui video.

    May 3, 2016

  • Royal Society video on their early Grangerised books

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RU-3uSORaZQ

    an original reference book would have articles and pictures cut from older books and pasted into a new Grangerised book which is now larger in size.

    May 3, 2016

  • What keeps some people from going to the gym.

    May 3, 2016

  • spotted this online

    May 3, 2016

  • The 1909 Rhymester says it has no rhyme.
    https://books.google.ca/books?id=v8ZZAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA134

    May 2, 2016

  • Sounds a bit like citogenesis

    May 1, 2016

  • cycling - Queen of the Mountain

    an expert hill climber. similar to KOM

    April 29, 2016

  • sounds evil

    April 29, 2016

  • when watching NASA videos, bunny suit refers to the antistatic cleanroom suits which cover the worker from head to toe.

    April 29, 2016

  • spotted online. looked this up to see other uses online.
    This word seems to have started with John Ringo books in 2006
    a whole bunch, a lot of

    April 28, 2016

  • a mosquito trap which uses 2 sections of rubber car tires and filter paper as a 'landing strip' to catch mosquito larva which prevents the mosquito population from increasing.

    spotted at BBC news
    "...the ovillanta is a clever — and highly effective — mosquito trap made from the pests' favourite breeding spot."

    April 28, 2016

  • A rocket liner to take passengers to the moon.
    http://www.yesterland.com/moonliners.html
    This goes back to the golden age of space travel.

    April 28, 2016

  • We'd need Christies auction house to handle the huge sum of money involved in the adoption price.

    April 28, 2016

  • 2016 Canadianism - someone who follows the NDP's Leap Manifesto
    (I try not to follow politics that much, but Leap and Leapers has showed up a lot in the news, and I"m not clear what it really 'means')

    April 27, 2016

  • ...has made the news.

    "Shawarmageddon: Moscow authorities threaten to ban kebabs"
    -The Guardian

    April 27, 2016

  • Nothing draws attention to a news article like a new word in the headline.

    April 26, 2016

  • Beyonce fans.

    April 26, 2016

  • Spotted in the news as smartphone zombies.

    April 26, 2016

  • spotted in messages where people discuss oligopolies of internet service.

    "Oligobble this! cable company"

    April 26, 2016

  • NASA astronaut speak for a "perfect P52 alignment" Manually measuring 2 target stars with a sextant and comparing that reading with the spacecraft's measurement to get all zero's in the difference between readings.

    https://books.google.ca/books?id=x-taL4N0sjIC&pg=PA174
    spotted in a vintage space video.

    April 25, 2016

  • The UK's communications regulator.

    April 25, 2016

  • l10n is defined in rfc6365 - but this abbreviation predates the 2011 standard.


    ' and "10" is the number of characters
    between the "l" and the "n" in "localization".'
    see i18n

    April 24, 2016

  • "for f***s sake"

    April 24, 2016

  • There's always the reverse dictionary to give a route to similar words.
    https://wordnik.com/words/betray#relate
    ie perfidious has similar words - unfaithful, disloyal, faithless, perfidy
    perfidy is more of a 19th century word according to an ngram viewer.

    If I were to create a new adjective, I'd make it colourful, like dogscoundrel

    update - double dipper,  double dipping dogscoundrel - dirty double dipping dogscoundrel

    April 24, 2016

  • a person who controls the lasers at a laser music show.

    April 24, 2016

  • Spotted in BBC comments section making fun of how someone spells youth.

    April 23, 2016

  • "Called the Highland Terrain Hopper, or HOPTER, the vehicle will use hopping—instead of driving—to explore the surface of other planets." - sciencemag

    also spotted MOPTER, PHOPTER, KBOPTER in the youtube video I spotted HOPTER

    April 21, 2016

  • translates to yummy, from the tweets, it spans several languages.

    April 21, 2016

  • see ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ

    April 21, 2016

  • This is known online as 'Happy Gary'
    Apparently he's going for a stroll.  Also, adoptable

    April 21, 2016

  • Some lumberjack waltz https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upsZZ2s3xv8

    April 20, 2016

  • Noun'd by Facebook.  👍

    April 19, 2016

  • See faded across

    April 19, 2016

  • Or FinTech. Financial Technology

    April 19, 2016

  • Spotted in a non Simpsons setting

    April 19, 2016

  • Lazy techie verb: to click "next" on a software install.

    Search for "next your way" gives

    "I'm sad to say, but you absolutely cannot Next-Next-Next your way through this installer, or you'll find ..."

    'Just “Next your way” through the wizard so you can get all the goodies.'

    'Just agree/accept/next your way through it. Nothing you can configure.'

    April 18, 2016

  • A quick search of "next your way" says yes, in the software install sense.

    Also spotted "next next next your way" with varying hyphens and commas. It's like "tabbing" as a verb in pressing the tab key.

    Repetitive installs are why people use pre-built images of an install.

    April 18, 2016

  • A non-domiciled person for tax purposes.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_people_with_non-domiciled_status_in_the_UK

    April 18, 2016

  • "The actual install process is a next-fest. You boot, you install, you next your way through." Spotted in Ars Technica article on building your own router.

    April 18, 2016

  • the fun part of a developer fixing a bug like this is that the tester has to effectively test a heisenbug
    If a tester were to verify that Þtestword1 can be commented on, then it changes the state of the database, and they'd have to go to Þtestword2

    Right now, a search for Þúsundþjalasmiður results in a 'lower case' suggested þúsundþjalasmiður

    In this case it's an entry currently not 'a word' because the like or list function hasn't been applied to it. Liking and Listing words results in the database having to keep track of it as if it were a word.

    A tester would have to enter Þtestword1, and verify the fix. Further tests would have to use an incremented test word because in verifying that Þtestword1 works, it's now in the database, so they'd have to use Þtestword2 and so on.

    Þtestword1 has been used...

    April 17, 2016

  • Spotted in an article about a ride-able hoverboard.

    April 17, 2016

  • For the 4 1/2 entry -
    "Nah, a 4 1/2 is a 2BR apartment, it's 4 rooms in total, counting kitchen and living room, plus 1/2 for the bathroom. As far as I know it's the Quebec-only way of describing apartments."
    spotted on reddit - https://www.reddit.com/r/canada/comments/4ewo5i/average_house_price_in_canada_jumps_15_to_508567/d24621h

    April 16, 2016

  • Refers to the language used relating to Apple and iDevices.

    ScienceFriday referred to the distinctive emoji set compared to the Android emoji set and how the different renderings are interpreted differently.

    "And the problem is not just a matter of translating from Apple-ese to Android-ese.". http://www.sciencefriday.com/segments/that-emoji-youre-sending-is-open-to-interpretation/

    April 15, 2016

  • Using electric and magnetic fields to assemble molecular things, from a research project at Rice University.

    April 15, 2016

  • Flying Spaghetti Monster-ism

    April 15, 2016

  • added gluggaveður to a list, and then commented on it.

    tried it with the other word you had issues with, vendingmachine I think this may be a wave a rubber chicken effect.

    April 15, 2016

  • adopted.
    Sorry for breaking wordnik bilby , vendingmachine

    April 15, 2016

  • refers to how movie posters only show Benedict Cumberbatch's back.

    April 14, 2016

  • "do science" seemed to become popular in the 1950's
    google ngram: https://goo.gl/cLEih6

    Usually when I see 'do science', it's related to NASA 'doing science'.

    April 14, 2016

  • All these spammers have 11 letters in their user names. At least the random words with a link ones do.

    April 14, 2016

  • A roadside check of a mobile device to see if texting was involved in a car crash.

    A roadside device used  by law enforcement to check a mobile phone at a crash scene.

    April 13, 2016

  • An angry mob of people attacking someone using twitter.
    Spotted in a Verge article about online moderation.

    April 13, 2016

  • Nooooo...

    spotted on late night tv.

    April 13, 2016

  • in looking up 6ix came across 5ive

    April 13, 2016

  • so.. "the 6ix" is Toronto.

    April 13, 2016

  • Internet vs internet

    It depends on your style guide and if you're referring to it in a formal sense.

    Big I Internet is a big entity which came out of research projects with ALLCAPS acronyms. It's all formal and centralized.

    Little i internet is in the background at the office or coffee shop providing general connectivity. It's there and it's not the main topic of the conversation.

    April 12, 2016

  • Initially spotted in a news article; a quick search shows this used in S America

    April 12, 2016

  • From memory, he coined the term spambomb which is a new word for me.

    April 12, 2016

  • As predicted, "Such an anti-spam algorithm would probably give a false positive for vogon anagram poetry, and some qms haikus."

    April 12, 2016

  • 2016 , people are using it as a 1 word response to say that something affected them, triggered PTSD, or caused them to have a flashback to a previous stressful event.  Usually, the term is used as hyperbole.

    April 12, 2016

  • .. from Star Wars
    Refers to space robots

    April 11, 2016

  • I find the number of letters in the words to be interesting.
    I think a spam filter could make use of a typical speech histogram and just look at the number of letters in a posting and see how many of the "1000 most common words" pop up versus a regular person's posting.

    The posting uses ZERO of top 20 most common english words

    https://wordnik.com/lists/top-20-most-common-english-words

    Such an anti-spam algorithm would probably give a false positive for vogon anagram poetry, and some qms haikus.  But it would be effective against some of the  polskispam.

    April 11, 2016

  • Twitter users who have the blue verified checkbox.

    Tweeted by J K Rowling in a library twitter war. http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/trending/j-k-rowling-scotland-library-twitter-rivalry-1.3521182

    April 10, 2016

  • spotted this while looking for english french dictionaries. https://books.google.ca/books?id=PekIAAAAQAAJ

    circa 1885 Covers Louisiana, Haiti, Guyana, Martinique


    Page 13 - pot calls the kettle black
    15 when the cat's away, the rats give a ball
    the dog that yelps doesn't bite
    17 cutting off one's nose is robbing one's face
    20 won't hold water


    April 10, 2016

  • "The National Museum of Computing (TNMOC) at Bletchley Park."

    April 9, 2016

  • China Internet Network Information Center

    April 9, 2016

  • Game of Thrones - a television show that everyone but me watches.

    April 9, 2016

  • GWX refers to the "get windows 10" notifications on a pc

    April 9, 2016

  • Spotted in a talk about climate change fiction

    April 8, 2016

  • spotted in a NYC news article for most obnoxious behavior

    "crop dusting (passing gas and walking away)"

    April 7, 2016

  • .. is an actual thing. Term goes back to ~2000

    April 6, 2016

  • a curved escarpment or cliff - typically found on Mars, Mercury, and the Moon.

    April 6, 2016

  • embedded multimedia card.
    ie, the manufacturer is using a micro SD card for internal device storage.

    April 6, 2016

  • starting to see this on twitter.
    example "God niced me with this weather for my bday boyyy"

    niced seems to have a history in England. 

    "NICE, NICED, NEIST,  adj. - particular, fastidious"
    https://books.google.ca/books?id=pHcKAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA98  Glossary of words used in South West Lincolnshire  1886


    April 5, 2016

  • "pay what you can"

    April 5, 2016

  • a haiku made of emoji's
    spotted on twitter #emojiku

    aug 2012.  Some emojikus mix words and emoji.Some are 5,7,5 emojis.

    April 3, 2016

  • Quick search shows this word used by someone else - Dec 2015

    April 3, 2016

  • i came across this as Engineering Change Request - a proposal that a change be made to a product, but the request should be reviewed before any changes made.

    April 2, 2016

  • manufacturing: Engineering Change Order

    April 2, 2016

  • also Residential Tenancy Branch

    April 2, 2016

  • nickname of Toronto's Brunswick House. now closed

    April 2, 2016

  • Spotted this as a prank that involves taping a photo of Nick Cage to the underside of an optical mouse.

    April 1, 2016

  • I pity the fool! - Mr. T

    April 1, 2016

  • ... wonders if warrant canary definition is a warrant canary

    April 1, 2016

  • spotted as Restricted Boltzman Machine

    April 1, 2016

  • beseem emcees becks seems...

    The scrabble and anagram solver sites can help.

    March 31, 2016

  • I've been noticing the increased usage of algorithm when referring to Facebook Google Instagram Amazon and other big web sites.
    It's almost like they're describing the personality of the site where the site maximizes ad revenue and games the users into using it more.
    But the rules of the game are hidden in a black box called 'the algorithm'.

    March 31, 2016

  • Typically "the olds"

    Old people

    March 30, 2016

  • network investigative technique

    March 30, 2016

  • They've fixed the Capitalized Word comment thing, as I was able to leave a comment on Norman door

    I think the lowercase redirect was to connect new users with a quick link to a word that had a definition which was lowercase instead of uppercase ie Monkey versus monkey

    March 30, 2016

  • No Disassemble! - Johnny 5

    March 30, 2016

  • word of the year.
    we should make woty the woty.

    March 29, 2016

  • see notes at norman door

    March 29, 2016

  • textspeak/acronym - quote of the day

    March 29, 2016

  • nested quotations - quoting something that quotes something else

    "quote quote quote 'nested quote' quote quote"

    ... ok that just looks wrong. 

    March 29, 2016

  • see super-note

    March 29, 2016

  • spotted this in a news article "Canada Slaps New Sanctions on 'Office 39,' North Korea’s Slush Fund for Kim Jong-un"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Room_39

    March 29, 2016

  • Long Baseline Neutrino Facility - Fermilab

    March 29, 2016

  • Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment - Fermilab.

    March 29, 2016

  • pokey stabby jabby?

    March 28, 2016

  • a pole with a syringe for tranquilizing animals.

    "This is a real technical operation isn't it. Got the shovel and the jab stick"
    spotted in CBC video about tagging bears.

    March 28, 2016

  • name of a new audible crosswalk signal in Canada.

    March 27, 2016

  • PID  ( proportional integral derivative) controller
    servo
    PLL  phase locked loop

    March 27, 2016

  • I get the impression someone added splain to linux just so they can type man splain

    March 25, 2016

  • when wind and water currents push a very large sheet of ice from a lake onto the shore buckling it and crushing it into a big noisy pile on the shoreline.

    March 24, 2016

  • I also spotted AaaS for Archive as a Service. Wazoo indeed.

    March 24, 2016

  • (Hannibal noises)
    Spotted at The Verge in a poll asking if people would try cannibalism.

    March 24, 2016

  • fibre-to-the-distribution-point spotted at The Register

    March 24, 2016

  • ..is one word. According to my friends.

    March 24, 2016

  • computing : typically to start up a virtual machine

    March 23, 2016

  • loo

    March 23, 2016

  • spotted TFM as 'total frat move'

    the dumb stuff you do when you're a partially drunk frat guy.

    March 22, 2016

  • linux jargon: LZMA Lempel–Ziv–Markov chain algorithm - related to compressing files and archives.

    March 22, 2016

  • Linux jargon: The last access time of a file.

    March 22, 2016

  • Linux jargon: The modification time. The last time a file was modified or touched.

    March 22, 2016

  • Linux term for when the command line shell uses /etc/glob to process wildcard inputs such as *? to perform an operation on multiple files or do something complicated.



    March 22, 2016

  • spotted in a Ted-Ed video about Geneviève Emy.

    word comes from Calligraphie Ideogramme

    March 22, 2016

  • today I learned... this is the wrong way to say without further ado

    March 20, 2016

  • Some news articles are saying that Vantablack is the blackest shade of black because it absorbs 99.96% of light. VACNT Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes absorb 99.97% of light.
    http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2012-11/fyi-what-darkest-material-earth


    I think there's room in the scientific world for developing a material which is black because of relativistic and quantum effects.  Hmmm.. quantum black ?

    March 20, 2016

  • Dean scream - Howard Dean's "Yeaaaahh!"

    March 19, 2016

  • spotted in the examples for pi-kus

    "pi-ems (poems about pi)"

    March 19, 2016

  • a haiku in pilish writing style.
    - spotted at the BBC

    March 19, 2016

  • spotted at the BBC - "The writing style inspired by pi"
    The first word has 3 letters, the second 1, the third 4 ... 


    more info at Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilish

    March 19, 2016

  • Googlenesia  - When your Googleheimers is so bad your brain can't remember what you wanted to look up.

    March 18, 2016

  • The flailing inflated wavy thing seen at blockbuster sales. http://globalnews.ca/news/2586410/oregon-town-fights-sea-lion-infestation-with-wacky-wailing-inflatable-arm-flailing-tube-men/

    March 18, 2016

  • An air dancer

    March 18, 2016

  • I've grown up with oolichan,  instead of eulachon
    mostly because I'd hear the word and never see it spelled

    March 18, 2016

  • Found a 2008 mtn bike free range definition here http://www.leelikesbikes.com/definition-of-braaap.html

    March 17, 2016

  • My favourite mountain biking word

    March 16, 2016

  • Franglais

    March 16, 2016

  • Spotted "gotta be a poe". It seems to be political slang for something.

    March 15, 2016

  • annoying memespeak for impossible

    March 15, 2016

  • Love all the community jargon there

    March 14, 2016

  • past tense verbish of the 404 error message.

    March 14, 2016

  • slang for a a manager who flies in, craps on everything and leaves

    I must have seen this word 25 years ago.

    The slang term goes back to 1986 to a John Stewart management book. Earlier search results give a "Seagull Management Ltd" company.

    March 13, 2016

  • I experience the same thing.   I'm assuming it's because of memory usage on the web server.

    March 12, 2016

  • Text speak for "I don't even know" showed up in the news http://www.theverge.com/2016/3/11/11187882/idek-venmo-flagged-transaction-terrorism

    March 11, 2016

  • Spotted a free range definition at https://cp4space.wordpress.com/2013/05/15/simultaneous-proofs/


    † Corollary-sniping is a rather impolite and dishonourable practice in which one jumps on a big theorem proved by someone else, and proves one or more corollaries using it. For instance, if someone suddenly exclaimed “Hence Fermat’s Last Theorem!” just as Andrew Wiles proved the necessary cases of the Tanayama-Shimura conjecture, that would have been an epic case of corollary-sniping (if that happened, hopefully the prize would still have been awarded to Wiles). An actual instance was when Xia’s proof that particles can be projected to infinity in finite time under Newtonian gravity was famously corollary-sniped to deduce that the n-body problem is undecidable."

    there's a 1971 citation on page 152 at https://books.google.ca/books?id=ZHwOAQAAMAAJ 

    March 11, 2016

  • Canada: the Do Not Call registry, a list which allegedly prevents telemarketers from calling, but ends up actually being a phone book for telemarketers.

    March 9, 2016

  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

    March 9, 2016

  • Even higher video resolution than 4k

    March 9, 2016

  • The sugar caddy gets around

    March 9, 2016

  • BBC magazine just had an article of the history of the at sign.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-35744456

    March 8, 2016

  • Spotted a buzzy buzzword. -The Register

    March 6, 2016

  • NOBUS spotted in computer security talk as "NObody But Us"
    The idea that the bad guys won't get their hands on a computer security back door or exploit.

    quick search show this also on Washington Post and Schneier's security blog.

    March 5, 2016

  • in making a pronunciation joke, I suddenly discover people actually have been using the word gjiff to make fun of the pronunciation debate.
    pronounced guh-jiff
    the debate will now be whether it's a hard gjiff or a soft gjiff

    March 4, 2016

  • hexadecimal digit - in ASCII computer grammar. 0123456789ABCDEFabcdef

    March 4, 2016

  • refers to the doublequote letter "

    March 4, 2016

  • carriage return, line feed.
    2 characters which tells a text renderer, printer, or output device to end a line, return to the left-hand column, and move one line down.

    March 4, 2016

  • skinny cable

    March 3, 2016

  • a quick search shows that it's related to telescopes (and rifle scopes) where the dot represents 1 milliradian, which lets a person know that at 1000 yards, the dot will cover an area seen in the scope being 1 yard across.

    reticle is a more generic term for any line on optics. Under a microscope, you'll generally have a scale for measuring small objects.


    the 'thou dot' is referring to a thousandth of a radian dot.

    March 3, 2016

  • "The name stands for Decrypting RSA with Obsolete and Weakened eNcryption, and the logo is a cracked padlock that’s about to be swamped by a wave."
    Spotted on Sophos Blog Naked Security

    March 3, 2016

  • Financial district

    March 2, 2016

  • Cumberbunny ... now a chocolate bunny with a Benedict Cumberbatch face.

    March 2, 2016

  • I've given up trying to keep track of the Register's creatively created words. I think it's mandatory for them to create a new word every day.

    March 1, 2016

  • ... because Twitter users can't spell Neil deGrasse Tyson

    March 1, 2016

  • spotted this term in the IETF glossary.
    This term goes back to 1975 computerworld.
    https://books.google.ca/books?id=f2XZVvbi_TAC&pg=PA6&dq=salami+swindle

    Finally, there is the instance security consultants have come to call the "salami swindle." Krauss reported a case in which a programmer "sliced off" rather than rounded off fractional shares bought in an employee investment plan and trans-ferred the fractions to his own account. When caught, the programmer had allegedly credited his account with some $380,000 worth of securities, Krauss reported"

    March 1, 2016

  • The IETF's definitions of the terms : "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT", "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL"

    March 1, 2016

  • the IETF's glossary of internet terms. It currently has 334 pages of definitions related to the internet and internet security.
    https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4949


    Interesting entries include:
    - 2 jokes listed under "Open Systems Interconnection"
    - the grammar of capitalizing internet/Internet web/Web
    - how intangible things are defined, like 'trust', "leap of faith" , acceptable risk, 
    - some slang words " bagbiter, brain-damaged, ohnosecond, salami swindle

    March 1, 2016

  • The writing style of technical documents which treat words in parentheses as literal things a person would type at a keyboard, so adding a grammatical comma or period within the items in parentheses would cause errors to a user typing those items into a computer.
    aka new punctuation
    Spotted in the IETF's RFC 4949 section 2.8
    https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4949


    However, a programmer would not include a character in a literal
    string if the character did not belong there, because that could
    cause an error. For example, suppose a sentence in a draft of a
    tutorial on the vi editing language looked like this:

    Then delete one line from the file by typing "dd".

    A book editor following standard usage might change the sentence to
    look like this:

    Then delete one line from the file by typing "dd."

    However, in the vi language, the dot character repeats the last
    command accepted. So, if a reader entered "dd.", two lines would be
    deleted instead of one.

    March 1, 2016

  • A raccoon

    March 1, 2016

  • Canadian Television: a government mandated basic cable: lower cost, and lower number of TV stations cable package

    March 1, 2016

  • Brexit

    February 29, 2016

  • Vox had a video where they described a Norman door, it's a door that doesn't work the way you expect it to. Perhaps it has a pull handle on each side of the door, yet one side should be 'push', or a pushbar where you should pull, or doors that don't follow the same pattern as other doors in the house.


    Of course, they interviewed a designer named Norman who named the Norman door after himself. 

    February 28, 2016

  • On mobile, cant leave comments on "Norman door

    February 27, 2016

  • Having the haircut of a tribble

    February 26, 2016

  • http://wordsmith.org/anagram/anagram.cgi?anagram=abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz&t=1000&a=n

    "An anagram for the entire alphabet is known as a pangram. Here are some pangrams:
    Mr. Jock TV quiz PhD bags few lynx
    Cwm fjord bank glyphs vext quiz
    Blowzy night-frumps vex'd Jack Q
    Veldt jynx grimps waqf zho buck"

    February 26, 2016

  • Anagram solver to the rescue

    veldt grimps jynx waqf zho buck

    February 26, 2016

  • my snow list has skifter of snow

    spotted in the comments section of http://www.word-detective.com/2009/08/skiff/

    The Scots will have to update their 'words for snow list'

    February 25, 2016

  • I like how the new Wordnik suggests alternates for case sensitive words.

    ... and sound effects.
    https://wordnik.com/words/Monkey#hear

    February 25, 2016

  • more than 1 crocus - spotted in my twitter feed.   the ngram viewer shows that most people use the term crocuses.  In some ways, you can consider this a spelling mistake, or an 'alternate spelling'.   It doesn't have the same 'is not a word' listing which other words get when people object to the use of a word.

    February 25, 2016

  • There should be a law that says you can't define a word using a more obscure word.

    February 24, 2016

  • "The park authorities said: "The Horsetail Fall phenomenon appears when the angle of the setting sun sets the waterfall ablaze with reds and oranges, like a fire was falling down the cliffs on the shoulder of El Capitan" -BBC

    February 23, 2016

  • I likely spelled this wrong.  I spotted this word in a YouTube video about Linux experts.

    February 22, 2016

  • ..."It’s a trick commonly performed by F-A/18 Hornet fighter-bombers, the mainstay of the US Navy’s carrier fleets. The Hornet is also used by the Blue Angels aerobatic team, and these pilots are adept at performing manoeuvres that creates these vapour cones – also known as ‘shock collars’ or ‘shock eggs’." -BBC
    "

    February 22, 2016

  • vm used correct tags in the comment.
    There seems to be something about using an italics tag which puts an extra italics tag outside of the comment. 

    http://imgur.com/UcLBCi4

    test

    February 21, 2016

  • Spotted in the iPhone encryption debate.   It's an insult.

    February 21, 2016

  • traffic on a California highway = end of the world.  Because language is hyperbolic.

    February 21, 2016

  • ...the italic close tags seem to not be working.  I tried to have italics with open and close tags, but the web page rendered as though it didn't process the tags.

    February 21, 2016

  • the visuals of this term is of an overseas parent airdropping their kids into another country to grow up.
    In reality, they probably just take a normal plane ride instead.

    spotted in LA Times


    "He lived in a private boarding house for teens like himself, so-called
    “parachute kids” studying at U.S. high schools while their parents
    stayed behind in China. He fell in with the wrong crowd."


    February 21, 2016

  • slang for related to Aspergers.
    I'd guess it's a bit of a slur.

    February 21, 2016

  • New Zealand prison slang. http://ir.canterbury.ac.nz/handle/10092/4789

    spotted in BBC article about anti-languages

    February 20, 2016

  • spotted again on Late Show with Stephen Colbert, feb 19, 2016

    "We could be a thrupple!"
    "Whatever that is"
     technically, Stephen would have seen this word before.. see 2014 comment.

    February 20, 2016

  • is an actual fish.
    "Meet the bony-eared assfish: a fish that looks about as good as it sounds! " -DailyPlanet


    but, how does it taste?

    February 19, 2016

  • "second generation rich"

    February 19, 2016

  • Backwards day. Quick search has this being on any day you want it to be on.

    February 19, 2016

  • "Comparing Thieves’ Cant to more recent analyses of the slang spoken in Calcutta (now commonly spelt as Kolkata) and elaborate “Grypserka” found among the inmates of Polish prisons, he found striking similarities in the patois spoken by all three underground groups and the ways it shaped their interactions.". http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20160211-the-secret-anti-languages-youre-not-supposed-to-know

    February 19, 2016

  • Giraffe. Aka. A camel leopard.

    February 19, 2016

  • Spotted this in a TedEd video about old Encyclopedias.

    From http://quod.lib.umich.edu/d/did/did2222.0000.243/--aguaxima?rgn=main;view=fulltext
    The Encyclopedia of Diderot & d'Alembert

    "Aguaxima, a plant growing in Brazil and on the islands of South America. This is all that we are told about it; and I would like to know for whom such descriptions are made. It cannot be for the natives of the countries concerned, who are likely to know more about the aguaxima than is contained in this description, and who do not need to learn that the aguaxima grows in their country. It is as if you said to a Frenchman that the pear tree is a tree that grows in France, in Germany, etc . It is not meant for us either, for what do we care that there is a tree in Brazil named aguaxima , if all we know about it is its name? What is the point of giving the name? It leaves the ignorant just as they were and teaches the rest of us nothing. If all the same I mention this plant here, along with several others that are described just as poorly, then it is out of consideration for certain readers who prefer to find nothing in a dictionary article or even to find something stupid than to find no article at all."

    February 18, 2016

  • Australian tumbleweed which takes over entire towns. At least It's not spiders, wildfires, crocodiles...

    February 18, 2016

  • another one for the fans and superfans list.

    February 18, 2016

  • ... wonder what chia tea tastes like.

    February 18, 2016

  • spotted this in my news feeds.

    February 17, 2016

  • either North Cackalacky or South Cackalacky

    February 17, 2016

  • a type of wolf that lives on the pacific northwest coast and eats crabs.

    spotted in local news  which referenced National Geographic.

    February 17, 2016

  • Wake Up Word - speech recognition.

    February 17, 2016

  • a word designed to trigger voice commands on a computing device.

    "Siri" "Ok, Google" "Alexa" "Hal..."  "Computer"


    February 17, 2016

  • no chickenpox?

    February 17, 2016

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