Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Fletcher looked at the concierge—a man in his early fifties—and asked him if he knew the name Adolphe Sarre.

    Days Between Stations

  • Fletcher looked at the concierge—a man in his early fifties—and asked him if he knew the name Adolphe Sarre.

    Days Between Stations

  • The rest of this sizable work was probably written by a certain Adolphe

    Alexis Soyer and the Rise of the Celebrity Chef

  • No one was calling Adolphe a joke anymore; but a lot of suspicious people held that in fact he was neither a genius nor an original but a shrewd con artist, who could not, when all was said and done, deliver.

    Days Between Stations

  • No one was calling Adolphe a joke anymore; but a lot of suspicious people held that in fact he was neither a genius nor an original but a shrewd con artist, who could not, when all was said and done, deliver.

    Days Between Stations

  • Some time afterwards, the happy judge, the happy engineer, the happy captain, the happy lawyer, the happy only son of a rich landed proprietor, in short Adolphe, comes to dine with you, accompanied by his family.

    Petty Troubles of Married Life

  • Some time afterwards, the happy judge, the happy engineer, the happy captain, the happy lawyer, the happy only son of a rich landed proprietor, in short Adolphe, comes to dine with you, accompanied by his family.

    Petty Troubles of Married Life, Complete

  • Some time afterwards, the happy judge, the happy engineer, the happy captain, the happy lawyer, the happy only son of a rich landed proprietor, in short Adolphe, comes to dine with you, accompanied by his family.

    Analytical Studies

  • After a year, when Adolphe-Maurice was four, Janine’s first word was not for her mother, or any of the small animate objects that first attract children; it was rather a garbled, but recognizable, version of the name Adolphe, to which the boy responded for the first time in a definite, comprehending way.

    Days Between Stations

  • After a year, when Adolphe-Maurice was four, Janine’s first word was not for her mother, or any of the small animate objects that first attract children; it was rather a garbled, but recognizable, version of the name Adolphe, to which the boy responded for the first time in a definite, comprehending way.

    Days Between Stations

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