Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The first king of Aegina, known for his piety and justice, appointed as a judge in Hades after his death.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Mythology]], '' 'Aeacus' '' was the first king of the island of [[Aegina]].

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • ]], '' 'Aeacus' '' was the first king of the island of [[Aegina]].

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • 'Twas in the day Pieria's fair-tressed choir came o'er the slopes of Pelion to the marriage-feast of Peleus, beating the ground with print of golden sandals at the banquet of the gods, and hymning in dulcet strains the praise of Thetis and the son of Aeacus, o'er the

    Iphigenia at Aulis

  • Telamon son of Aeacus came in haste to Jason, and grasping his hand in his own embraced him with these words:

    The Argonautica

  • Proteus during his life-time was king of this land, dwelling in the isle of Pharos, and ruling o'er Egypt; and he took to wife one of the daughters of the sea, Psamathe, after she left the embraces of Aeacus.

    Helen

  • 'Twas in the day Pieria's fair-tressed choir came o'er the slopes of Pelion to the marriage-feast of Peleus, beating the ground with print of golden sandals at the banquet of the gods, and hymning in dulcet strains the praise of Thetis and the son of Aeacus, o'er the

    Iphigenia at Aulis

  • And they would quickly have turned back to the land of the Mysians, forcing their way through the deep sea and the unceasing blasts of the wind, had not the two sons of Thracian Boreas held back the son of Aeacus with harsh words.

    The Argonautica

  • Proteus during his life-time was king of this land, dwelling in the isle of Pharos, and ruling o'er Egypt; and he took to wife one of the daughters of the sea, Psamathe, after she left the embraces of Aeacus.

    Helen

  • After them came the sons of Aeacus, not both together, nor from the same spot; for they settled far from Aegina in exile, when in their folly they had slain their brother Phocus.

    The Argonautica

  • ‘The sons of Aeacus who rejoiced in battle as though a feast.’

    Hesiod, Homeric Hymns, and Homerica

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