Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A king of Athens and the father of Theseus.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun Greek mythology A character in the founding myth of Athens.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek Αἰγεύς (Aigeús).

Examples

  • So the kid forgets to raise the flag as he sails in to show he is alive, and Aegeus throws himself to the fishes.

    Chalky goes to night school and studies the Classics

  • And I don't even want to think about Aethra shtupping Posiden and Aegeus at the same time.

    Chalky goes to night school and studies the Classics

  • When Theseus set out to defeat the Minotaur on Crete, Aegeus made him promise to set white sails on the way back, so that he would understand if the mission had been successful.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The Most Jewish Greek Myth:

  • But do ye, aged ladies, remove from my mother your holy wreaths, that I may take her by the hand and conduct her to the house of Aegeus; for a wretched son is he who rewards not his parents by service; for, when he hath conferred on them the best he hath, he in his turn from his own sons receives all such service as he gave to them.

    The Suppliants

  • How did the son of Aegeus and his fellow-warriors raise their trophy to Zeus?

    The Suppliants

  • All hail to thee likewise, Aegeus, son of wise Pandion.

    Medea

  • May Maia's princely son go with thee on thy way to bring thee to thy home, and mayest thou attain that on which thy soul is set so firmly, for to my mind thou seemest a generous man, O Aegeus.

    Medea

  • Aegeus, Pandion's son, according to the oracle of Loxias.

    The Suppliants

  • Aegeus, Pandion's son, according to the oracle of Loxias.

    The Suppliants

  • But do ye, aged ladies, remove from my mother your holy wreaths, that I may take her by the hand and conduct her to the house of Aegeus; for a wretched son is he who rewards not his parents by service; for, when he hath conferred on them the best he hath, he in his turn from his own sons receives all such service as he gave to them.

    The Suppliants

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