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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Aeschylus's wife, Clytemnestra, welcomed the warrior home from Troy with a red carpet, saying, Now my beloved, step down from your chariot, and let not your foot, my lord, touch the Earth.

    Candace Vorhaus: Walking the Red Carpet

  • Overlain on the story of Aue's war journey is a parallel association with Aeschylus's Oresteia, featuringAue as Orestes (a device similar to the "mythic method" of Joyce's Ulysses).

    Translated Texts

  • Overlain on the story of Aue's war journey is a parallel association with Aeschylus's Oresteia, featuringAue as Orestes (a device similar to the "mythic method" of Joyce's Ulysses).

    Point of View in Fiction

  • Aeschylus's wife, Clytemnestra, welcomed the warrior home from Troy with a red carpet, saying, Now my beloved, step down from your chariot, and let not your foot, my lord, touch the Earth.

    Candace Vorhaus: Walking the Red Carpet

  • Overlain on the story of Aue's war journey is a parallel association with Aeschylus's Oresteia, featuringAue as Orestes (a device similar to the "mythic method" of Joyce's Ulysses).

    December 2009

  • Overlain on the story of Aue's war journey is a parallel association with Aeschylus's Oresteia, featuringAue as Orestes (a device similar to the "mythic method" of Joyce's Ulysses).

    Furies

  • Aeschylus's The Persians is the earliest Greek play? and therefore the earliest play in the western tradition? to survive complete.

    The National Theatre of Wales does battle with Aeschylus's The Persians

  • As this play trembles between historical and poetic-mythological worlds (worlds which the Greeks of Aeschylus's time may not have differentiated as sharply as we do) so it seems to flit irresolutely, frustratingly in the imagination.

    The National Theatre of Wales does battle with Aeschylus's The Persians

  • Aeschylus's own Oresteia, for instance, chooses as its starting point the nostos, the return home, of the victorious general Agamemnon after the siege of Troy.

    The National Theatre of Wales does battle with Aeschylus's The Persians

  • Aeschylus's Persians are not noble, admirable creatures but instead stand for everything the Greeks, according to their own self-image, are not.

    The National Theatre of Wales does battle with Aeschylus's The Persians

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