Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun plural The gods of the Norse pantheon.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun Alternative spelling of Æsir.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Old Norse, pl. of āss, god; see ansu- in Indo-European roots.]

Examples

  • Here we see the first beings, and the first of the Aesir (interestingly, this may be the only place in Marvel where the gods are called the Aesir; they are virtually always called Asgardians by the Bullpen).

    Quick Hits – Star Trek Comics, The Unwritten, The Unknown, Blackest Night, Flash: Rebirth, and More

  • Here we see the first beings, and the first of the Aesir (interestingly, this may be the only place in Marvel where the gods are called the Aesir; they are virtually always called Asgardians by the Bullpen).

    19 « May « 2009 « Axiom's Edge Science Fiction and Fantasy

  • The Aesir are the sky gods of the Scandinavian Pagans, complemented by the Vanir, or the Earth/underworld gods, who control agriculture, death, and other Earthy things.

    Where To Park Your Broomstick

  • The Aesir are the sky gods of the Scandinavian Pagans, complemented by the Vanir, or the Earth/underworld gods, who control agriculture, death, and other Earthy things.

    Where To Park Your Broomstick

  • Aesir, which is rolling out models in Cyrillic and Chinese, generated buzz with its glitzy promotion in Moscow last week.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • Aesir, which is rolling out models in Cyrillic and Chinese, generated buzz with its glitzy promotion in Moscow last week.

    Reuters: Press Release

  • Aesir, which is rolling out models in Cyrillic and Chinese, generated buzz with its glitzy promotion in Moscow last week.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • The main character, Freya – one of the Aesir (gods) – has her own problems to deal with in life and love, while many other characters, including Odin, an unusual dwarf, and a group of giants deal with their own subplots.

    “Ice Land” by Betsy Tobin (Plume, 2009) « The BookBanter Blog

  • The main character, Freya – one of the Aesir (gods) – has her own problems to deal with in life and love, while many other characters, including Odin, an unusual dwarf, and a group of giants deal with their own subplots.

    2010 February 21 « The BookBanter Blog

  • “Frigg, Queen of the Aesir, wife of Odin the shape-shifter, look down from Asgard, where you sit before your wheel in Fensalir spinning golden thread.”

    Arcane Circle

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.