Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • A mountain range of south-central Alaska rising to 6,194 m (20,320 ft) at Mount McKinley, the highest mountain of North America.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a mountain range in south central Alaska; contains Mount McKinley

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Alaska Range is a continuation of the Pacific Coast Mountains extending in an arc across the northern Pacific.

    Alaska Range Humid Tayga - Tundra - Meadow (Bailey)

  • This sharp curve, for all the world like a monstrous granite hinge connecting the northwesterly and southwesterly limbs of the System, is the gigantic Alaska Range, which is higher and broader than the Sierra Nevada, and of greater relief and extent than the Alps. Near the centre of this range, its climax in position, height, bulk, and majesty, stands Mount McKinley.

    The Book of the National Parks

  • Our little dogsledding outing began at the river village of Bettles, north of the Alaska Range, north of the Yukon, north of the Arctic Circle, north of almost everything on the planet.

    Richard Bangs: So, You Think That's Cold?

  • Our little dogsledding outing began at the river village of Bettles, north of the Alaska Range, north of the Yukon, north of the Arctic Circle, north of almost everything on the planet.

    Richard Bangs: So, You Think That's Cold?

  • The Alaska Range supports large big-game populations of moose, Dall sheep, black and brown bear, wolf, caribou, and wolverine.

    Alaska Range Humid Tayga - Tundra - Meadow (Bailey)

  • The Alaska Range and the Wrangell Mountains have a transitional climate of severe winters and hot, dry summers.

    Alaska Range Humid Tayga - Tundra - Meadow (Bailey)

  • The Alaska Range has a continental climatic regime, but because of the extreme height of many of the ridges and peaks, annual precipitation at higher elevations is similar to that measured for some ecoregions having maritime climate.

    Ecoregions of the United States-Level III (EPA)

  • Vertical vegetational zonation characterizes the Alaska Range and Wrangell Mountains, beginning with dense bottom-land stands of white spruce and cottonwood on the floodplains and low terraces of the Copper and Susitna Rivers.

    Alaska Range Humid Tayga - Tundra - Meadow (Bailey)

  • White mountain-avens may cover entire ridges in the Alaska Range, associated with moss campion, black oxytrope, arctic sandwort, lichens, grasses, and sedges.

    Alaska Range Humid Tayga - Tundra - Meadow (Bailey)

  • The towering, glaciated peaks of the Wrangell Mountains and of the Alaska Range -- which includes Mt. McKinley at 20,320 ft (6,194 m) -- typify the ruggedness of the area.

    Alaska Range Humid Tayga - Tundra - Meadow (Bailey)

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