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Examples

  • Stung at this, Gudrun retorts that not Gunnar but Sigurd had penetrated the flames and had taken from her the fateful ring "Andvaranaut", which she then shows to her rival in proof of her assertion.

    The Nibelungenlied

  • Stung at this, Gudrun retorts that not Gunnar but Sigurd had penetrated the flames and had taken from her the fateful ring “Andvaranaut”, which she then shows to her rival in proof of her assertion.

    The Nibelungenlied

  • Sigurd gives Brynhild the ring Andvaranaut, which belonged to the hoard, as a pledge, and takes it from her again later when he woos her in

    The Edda, Volume 2 The Heroic Mythology of the North, Popular Studies in Mythology, Romance, and Folklore, No. 13

  • Python, while the ring Andvaranaut can be likened to Venus's cestus, and the curse attached to its possessor is like the tragedy of Helen, who brought endless bloodshed upon all connected with her.

    Myths of the Norsemen From the Eddas and Sagas

  • He then wandered off in search of the mighty hoard, and, after donning the Helmet of Dread, the hauberk of gold, and the ring Andvaranaut, and loading Greyfell with as much gold as he could carry, he sprang to the saddle and sat listening eagerly to the birds 'songs to know what his future course should be.

    Myths of the Norsemen From the Eddas and Sagas

  • When the fourth morning dawned, Sigurd drew the ring Andvaranaut from

    Myths of the Norsemen From the Eddas and Sagas

  • From the top of Hindarfiall, Brunhild now pointed out to Sigurd her former home, at Lymdale or Hunaland, telling him he would find her there whenever he chose to come and claim her as his wife; and then, while they stood on the lonely mountain top together, Sigurd placed the ring Andvaranaut upon her finger, in token of betrothal, swearing to love her alone as long as life endured.

    Myths of the Norsemen From the Eddas and Sagas

  • Andvaranaut, around which she had twined a wolf's hair.

    Myths of the Norsemen From the Eddas and Sagas

  • On arriving at Hreidmar's house, Loki found the mighty treasure none too great, for the skin became larger with every object placed upon it, and he was forced to throw in the ring Andvaranaut (Andvari's loom), which he had intended to retain, in order to secure the release of himself and his companions.

    Myths of the Norsemen From the Eddas and Sagas

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