Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • Marcus

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun Roman general under Julius Caesar in the Gallic wars; repudiated his wife for the Egyptian queen Cleopatra; they were defeated by Octavian at Actium (83-30 BC)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The New York Times reviewer called Antonius “an eloquent advocate” of Arab nationalism.

    Crossing Mandelbaum Gate

  • The New York Times reviewer called Antonius “an eloquent advocate” of Arab nationalism.

    Crossing Mandelbaum Gate

  • Is the little worm aware that one reason I stay so close to Italia is to keep the name Marcus Antonius alive in Italian eyes?

    Antony and Cleopatra

  • An opinion shared by a troupe of musicians and dancers who had hastened from Byzantium at the news of his advent in the neighborhood; from Spain to Babylonia, every member of the League of Dionysiac Entertainers knew the name Marcus Antonius.

    Antony and Cleopatra

  • Is the little worm aware that one reason I stay so close to Italia is to keep the name Marcus Antonius alive in Italian eyes?

    Antony and Cleopatra

  • Cicero, in the second Philippic calls Antonius a catamite; but in

    Satyricon

  • An opinion shared by a troupe of musicians and dancers who had hastened from Byzantium at the news of his advent in the neighborhood; from Spain to Babylonia, every member of the League of Dionysiac Entertainers knew the name Marcus Antonius.

    Antony and Cleopatra

  • Her Antonius is a bit of a lad, if you follows me, but not cruel.

    Fortune's Favorites

  • Cicero, in the second Philippic calls Antonius a catamite; but in Republican Rome, it is to Catullus that we must turn to find the most decisive evidence of their almost universal inclination to sodomy.

    The Satyricon — Volume 06: Editor's Notes

  • Cicero, in the second Philippic calls Antonius a catamite; but in Republican Rome, it is to Catullus that we must turn to find the most decisive evidence of their almost universal inclination to sodomy.

    The Satyricon — Complete

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