Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A member of a widespread group of Indian peoples living in an area of South America that includes parts of Colombia, Venezuela, Guiana, the Amazon basin of Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia, Peru, and formerly most of the Greater Antilles.
  • noun A large language family of South and Central America, including Taíno, many other living and extinct languages of South America spoken by Arawakan peoples, and Garifuna.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective of or relating to the peoples who speak the language of the Arawak
  • noun a member of a widespread group of Amerindians living in northeastern South America
  • noun a family of South American Indian languages spoken in northeastern South America

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Within days of establishing Jinogojé, Schultes began planning an expedition to the homeland of the Yukuna, an Arawakan people inhabiting the Miritiparaná, a remote tributary of the Caquetá born in the lightly forested uplands south of the Apaporis.

    One River

  • Within days of establishing Jinogojé, Schultes began planning an expedition to the homeland of the Yukuna, an Arawakan people inhabiting the Miritiparaná, a remote tributary of the Caquetá born in the lightly forested uplands south of the Apaporis.

    One River

  • Despite the divine origins, thunderstones are not uncommon in Haiti; Westerners think of them as pre-Columbian axe heads and attribute their origins to the Arawakan Indians.

    The Serpent and the Rainbow

  • They belong to the great Arawakan linguistic stock, to which along belong the warlike

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • One great South American stock — the Arawakan — after occupying the Antilles, completed the chain of connection by planting

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • Of these, the Moxos and Paicone, with all their dialects, belong to the widespread Arawakan stock of eastern and central Brazil; the Movima, Cayubaba, Itonama, Canichana, and

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

  • Practically the whole of the West Indies were occupied by tribes of two linguistic stocks, the earlier of the Arawakan origin, the more recent being Cariban invaders from the northern coast of South

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • The Arawakan aborigines were about in the cultural status of our own Gulf tribes, subsisting chiefly by agriculture and practicing the simpler arts, but unfitted by their peaceful habit to withstand the inroads of the predatory Carib, whose very name is synonymous with "cannibal".

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • Columbia, speaking dialects of the Arawakan stock.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • The Enawene-nawe speak an Arawakan language, which is very similar to that spoken by the Paresí.

    Everything2 New Writeups

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