Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of Armagnac.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • There were doubtless only too many, who, like him, were ready to believe that the Maid of the Armagnacs was a heretic, a worshipper of idols and given to the practice of magic.

    The Life of Joan of Arc, Vol. 1 and 2

  • "With the Armagnacs is a creature in woman's form.

    The Life of Joan of Arc, Vol. 1 and 2

  • It was a unique experience ... and if you remember anything he has told you after the tour and several farewell Armagnacs, you're sure to impress someone at a wine tasting someday.

    Richard Powell: PHOTOS: A Holiday Spent Amongst The Wineries Of Languedoc

  • It was a unique experience ... and if you remember anything he has told you after the tour and several farewell Armagnacs, you're sure to impress someone at a wine tasting someday.

    Richard Powell: PHOTOS: A Holiday Spent Amongst The Wineries Of Languedoc

  • There are still grand villas in Palm Beach—20,000-square-foot beach shacks full of Aubussons, Gobelins, ormolu, humidors, cellars provisioned with ancient Armagnacs and crates of 1961 Lafite Rothschild.

    Dream State

  • Isabella dying, her husband (Duke of Orleans since the death of his father) married the daughter of the Count of Armagnac, who, being a much abler man than his young son-in-law, headed his party; thence called after him Armagnacs.

    A Child's History of England

  • This gourmet French restaurant overlooks the gardens above Lake Geneva and has an outside terrace and an impressive wine cellar--try roughly 75,000 bottles and a large selection of Grand Crus and aged Armagnacs.

    Swiss Bliss

  • Then, when the coffee arrived and while the other three sipped Armagnacs, I told them about Grace Peltier, Jack Mercier, and the death of Yossi Epstein.

    The Killing Kind

  • Henry V, with 10,000 men, defeated three times that number of French; the duke of Orléans was taken prisoner; Normandy was reconquered by the English, undoing for the time the work of Philip Augustus; the dauphin (later Charles VII) fled to the south of France (1418); the Burgundians returned to power, and there was a massacre of Armagnacs in Paris (1418).

    1388

  • Rouen fell; the Burgundians, alarmed at the English advance, began negotiating with the Armagnacs; John of Burgundy was assassinated at a conference with the dauphin at the bridge of Montereau, and the Burgundians returned to the English alliance.

    1388

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