Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • A river of central Italy rising in the northern Apennines and flowing about 240 km (150 mi) to the Ligurian Sea. Flooding of the Arno in 1966 caused severe damage to art treasures in Florence.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A river in Tuscany that flows through Pisa and Florence.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a river in central Italy rising in the Apennines and flowing through Florence and Pisa to the Ligurian Sea

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Arno is shorter and less featured and framed than the Florentine, but it has the fine accent of a marked curve and is quite as bravely Tuscan; witness the type of river-fronting palace which, in half-a-dozen massive specimens, the last word of the anciently

    Italian Hours

  • I received the Prato gate and the little one of Arno, which is on the way to the mills.

    The Autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini

  • In Pisa, at such an hour, the Arno is the emblem of Despair.

    Alone

  • I received the Prato gate and the little one of Arno, which is on the way to the mills.

    LXXXV

  • North of the Arno was a wide tract of marshland, which had to be crossed before the Apennine mountains could be reached.

    The Red Book of Heroes

  • Will you still contradict me if I maintain -- the Arno is a shallow, narrow stream, just fit to sail a boy's bark-boat.

    The Burgomaster's Wife — Volume 03

  • Will you still contradict me if I maintain -- the Arno is a shallow, narrow stream, just fit to sail a boy's bark-boat.

    Complete Project Gutenberg Georg Ebers Works

  • Angelo's house, with his pictures, clothes, and painting implements, just as he left it three centuries ago; on the south side of the Arno is the house of Galileo, and that of Machiavelli stands in an avenue near the Ducal Palace.

    Views a-foot

  • But still the Arno is a mountain stream, and liable to be tetchy and turbulent like all its kindred, and no doubt it often finds its borders of hewn stone not too far apart for its convenience.

    Passages from the French and Italian Notebooks, Complete

  • But still the Arno is a mountain stream, and liable to be tetchy and turbulent like all its kindred, and no doubt it often finds its borders of hewn stone not too far apart for its convenience.

    Passages from the French and Italian Notebooks, Volume 2.

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