Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun One of the chiefs or pontiffs of the Roman province of Asia, who had the superintendence of the public games and religious rites.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin Asiarcha, Ancient Greek.

Examples

  • Speaking thus, they cried out, and besought Philip the Asiarch [452] to let loose a lion upon Polycarp.

    ANF01. The Apostolic Fathers with Justin Martyr and Irenaeus

  • The mob rushed frantically upon the crowd of book-destroyers, and would have torn them to pieces but for the intervention of the law, represented by an Asiarch who was present.

    Saronia A Romance of Ancient Ephesus

  • 'That is impossible' was the answer of the Asiarch, 'for the sports have closed.'

    The Quarterly Review, Volume 162, No. 324, April, 1886

  • The great annual festival was being held at Smyrna, presided over by the Asiarch and 'high priest' [95] Philip, a wealthy citizen of the wealthy Tralles, and graced by the presence of the Proconsul Statius Quadratus.

    The Quarterly Review, Volume 162, No. 324, April, 1886

  • [95] The subjects of the Asiarchate, of the identity of Asiarch and high-priest, have suggested to the Bishop of Durham another of those exhaustive discussions which will win for him the gratitude of the students (see ii. 987, &c.) [96] The name given by the heathen to the Christians, whom they counted godless because they had neither image nor visible representation of the

    The Quarterly Review, Volume 162, No. 324, April, 1886

  • With the honour of president of the annual festival of the emperor went other distinctions, a special title (Asiarch, Bithyniarch, Galatarch), in addition to various marks of honour.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 1: Aachen-Assize

  • Saying these things, they cried out and demanded of Philip, the Asiarch, to let a lion loose upon Polycarp.

    A Source Book for Ancient Church History

  • On the outskirts of the crowd are numerous bonfires, upon which Jew and Gentile are throwing into the flames bundle upon bundle of scrolls, while an Asiarch with his peace-officers looks on with the conventional stolidity of policemen in all ages and all nations.

    The Enemies of Books

  • Sometimes the same person will unite in himself the two offices of recorder and Asiarch, either simultaneously or not.

    Essays on the work entitled "Supernatural Religion"

  • On the outskirts of the crowd are numerous bonfires, upon which Jew and Gentile are throwing into the flames bundle upon bundle of scrolls, while an Asiarch with his peace-officers looks on with the conventional stolidity of policemen in all ages and all nations.

    The Enemies of Books

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.