Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • A village of southern France at the foot of the Pyrenees. It is the site of caves containing prehistoric relics.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In 1902, a political and financial scandal rocked the French nation when it was discovered that Madame Thérèse Humbert (nee Aurignac), daughter-in-law of the deceased Minister of Justice, had swindled nearly 100 million francs from the French government and its citizens over twenty years.

    L’Affaire Humbert | Edwardian Promenade

  • Pyrenees has not, it is evident, touched this elevated spot in Aurignac.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, No. 62, December, 1862

  • In it were found the human remains, it was estimated, of seventeen individuals, which were afterwards buried formally by the order of the mayor of Aurignac.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, No. 62, December, 1862

  • Some ten years since, in Aurignac, (Haute Garonne,) in the

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, No. 62, December, 1862

  • It is interesting that similar stencillings of the hands were made by cave men on the walls of some of the European caves, as, for instance, those of Aurignac in southern France.

    Popular Science Monthly Oct, Nov, Dec, 1915 — Volume 86

  • The chain of evidence in regard to this important question seems to be filled out by a recent discovery of M. Edouard Lartet in Aurignac, in the South of France, on the head-waters of the Garonne.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, No. 62, December, 1862

  • The instance mentioned most prominently, that of the burial cave at Aurignac, France, has been shown to have no bearing on the question, as every thing indicates that the burials were of a much later date.

    The Prehistoric World; or, Vanished races

  • It is interesting that similar stencillings of the hands were made by cave men on the walls of some of the European caves, as, for instance, those of Aurignac in southern France.

    The Scientific Monthly, October-December 1915

  • Lartet's investigations that the inhabitants of the Aurignac region in the south of France partook of tribal meals at the burial of their dead.

    Mutual Aid; a factor of evolution

  • Unfortunately the skulls were injured in the transfer; and what is worse, after the lapse of eight years, when M. Lartet visited Aurignac, the village sexton was unable to tell him in what exact place the trench was dug, into which the skeletons had been thrown, so that this rich harvest of ethnological knowledge seems for ever lost to the antiquary and geologist.

    The Antiquity of Man

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