Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun A city in Poland, also called Oświęcim.
  • proper noun A concentration camp in what is now Poland; used metonymically for Nazi evil, the Holocaust.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a Nazi concentration camp for Jews in southwestern Poland during World War II

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From German Auschwitz, the German name for the town of Oświęcim, which the concentration camp was near.

Examples

  • Jacek Bednarczyk/European Pressphoto Agency MARKING AUSCHWITZ: Piotr Cywinski, director of the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum, laid a wreath at the crematorium furnace during ceremonies marking the 64th anniversary of the liberation of the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz in Oswiecim, Poland, Tuesday.

    Today's Photos: Jan. 27

  • What I discovered in Auschwitz is the human condition, the end point of a great adventure, where the European traveler arrived after his two-thousand-year-old moral and cultural history.

    Nobel Lecture - Literature 2002

  • Vrba felt that if the Hungarian Jews knew about the fate that awaited them in Auschwitz they would rise up and resist.

    Reviews

  • Vrba felt that if the Hungarian Jews knew about the fate that awaited them in Auschwitz they would rise up and resist.

    theBookmark

  • Vrba felt that if the Hungarian Jews knew about the fate that awaited them in Auschwitz they would rise up and resist.

    Members

  • He spent nearly two years in Auschwitz I and Auschwitz II (Birkenau), adjoining camps whose outer perimeters met and were separated by a railway line.

    Reviews

  • Vrba felt that if the Hungarian Jews knew about the fate that awaited them in Auschwitz they would rise up and resist.

    Chapter News

  • He spent nearly two years in Auschwitz I and Auschwitz II (Birkenau), adjoining camps whose outer perimeters met and were separated by a railway line.

    Chapter News

  • In the final frame of the film, he was disclosed weeping before a memorial in Auschwitz to dead ancestors who, until that moment, he had never known he'd had.

    Howard Jacobson offers a contrary voice in the arts

  • He spent nearly two years in Auschwitz I and Auschwitz II (Birkenau), adjoining camps whose outer perimeters met and were separated by a railway line.

    theBookmark

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